Piggybacking mental health training

first_imgDear Editor,The media recently reported on the consolidation of key youth programmes and organisations into the Guyana Youth Service (GYS) and the subsequent offering of a standardised education and training curriculum as measures to significantly improve youths’ marketability and prospects for gainful employment. The Caribbean Voice once again urges that this is a perfect opportunity for the standardised curriculum to include modules on mental health.This is a critically imperative given that in Guyana, among other things, the 15 to 25 age group has the highest suicide rate, and subject themselves and/or are subjected to significant abuse including increasing alcohol and drug use, involvement in gangs, a propensity for violent behaviour and physical and sexual abuse.In effect, many Guyanese in general and youths especially, struggle with self-esteem and self-confidence, lack enduring coping skills and an overarching capacity to deal with challenges and stress; all of which are important traits that foster personal advancement, the ability to manoeuvre in the market place and the drive for increasing success in the work place. Such attributes also arm individuals with the wherewithal to resist impulses that can lead to self-harm, depression, anxiety, and pathological and anti-social behaviour.The bottom line is that without the tools to foster mental health and wellbeing, all the training in the world can end up being an exercise in futility. And adding relevant mental modules in the current training curriculum – self-esteem, coping skills, emphatic communication, anxiety and depression, suicide and abuse – will ensure that the campaign to significantly improve youths’ marketability and prospects for gainful employment attains significant success. Besides, this kind of piggybacking is tremendously more cost-effective than separate mental health training, not to mention more far-reaching as well.Sincerely,The Caribbean Voicelast_img read more

Resource Management of Serious Concern in Kigali

first_imgA session of the ongoing African Development Bank 49th Annual Meeting in Kigali, Rwanda, addressed another serious issue of Resource Management on May 20, 2014, leaving two African officials including SEM Kerfalla Yasane, Minister of Economic & Geology of Guinea, and Mrs. Daphne Mashile-Nkosi, Chief Executive Officer of Kaladadi Manganese of South Africa to recommend community and national interests in resources governance.The two African officials observe that Africa has a wealth that attract investors and they (investors) are moving in for it; however, they claim that proceeds from the investment only benefit investors and a few in government and not communities from where the resources are taken.Ms Mashile-Nkosi who was very vocal in the panel discussion noted, “Africa should look at a new contracting philosophy.  Africans should prioritize themselves in signing contracting with mining and other super companies taking resources in Africa.”Discussing under the topic, “From inherited to created wealth:  Natural Resources Management,” Ms Mashile-Nkosi stressed that African leaders should establish a system that locals will have greater role in the mining and extractive business with incoming foreign companies, asserting that it will allow the locals to be conscious of what is going out and what’s remaining, and what benefit it will leave with the dwellers.According to her, this will help to protect the interest of the local communities from where the resources are taken, and will prevent more harm when the company draws back for any financial or other reason.She observes that companies coming to Africa to investment in mining have left local communities damaged with no infrastructure or tangible benefits for dwellers to point at, noting that investors take more from them while environmental hazard remains as a symbol of their (investors) presence.“It is important that if you mine the mineral resources, you leave something for the community,” Ms Mashile-Nkosi noted.Referring to it as social investment, the outspoken South African CEO argued that something must be left in the community where big holes are dug while extracting mineral because at the end of the day the community and people will remain while company goes away.Minister SEM Kerfalla Yasane for his part acknowledged that his country Guinea has a great potential of minerals including Bauxite and Iron Ore.According to him, a big iron ore project had been launched in the country, but the outcome is frustration because the people who are the chief custodians of the resources continue to live in abject poverty as though they do not have such wealth.He said the current Guinean Government having realized the frustration encountered by citizens in the management of their own resources, has adopted a new policy based on transparency and accountability.He said the government has therefore decided to review all mining contracts in Guinea to ensure that benefits of the resources impact the citizens as well.He disclosed that there are 18 mining contracts currently signed by the Guinean Government, adding, “The contracts were also given the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and the African Development Bank to evaluate.”For citizens of the country to build trust in government and companies coming in, Minister Yasane said the new mining code of Guinea takes into account local content priority and a tax system that will make Guinea competitive as the companies extract.In addition to these, the Minister said they are also trying to set up a team that will implement public policy on behalf of government to create more local investors who will work side by side with foreign companies.He was also cautious to note that mining investment is a capital intensive project that takes billions of dollars to construct facilities that will enhance extraction.He said because of the huge task associated with mining, it takes a long time to do since major constructions including railway have to be completed before a company begins.Another panelist, Sir Paul Collier, Director of Center for the Study of African Economics at Oxford University sharing his expert opinion said, what comes from the ground is an asset, and getting it out is depleting that asset.To have a sustainable return from the asset leaving the community, Sir Collier said government needs to use revenues from the asset to build tangible things that will remain in the community from where the asset is taken.He said if income from the revenue is consumed, it means that government is burning its asset.Jonathan Oppenheimer, one of the panelists whose family has been engaged in investment in the mineral sector for years in Africa also said both parties involved with the mineral investment have to create the opportunity for a sustainable investment return and benefit for the community wherein the mineral exists.Mr. Oppenheimer stressed that creating a regulatory system that is transparent to allow investors have a long term investment is important because if they do not invest, the resources are not extracted to yield the benefits needed for either parties.He observed that the regulatory system over the last twenty years has had a short-term investment outlook, which according to him has left investors with the option to seek their own interest since they need returns on their investment.He said as a result of this short-term investment outlook, more junior investors (locally oriented) that do not have the capital have emerged.“There is a real need to examine what state needs from its resources and have a transparent regulatory system that will provide an enabling environment for investors who want to invest.Meanwhile, views from the audience showed that African countries that have resources share the same curse as investors take more and leave little or nothing for the communities.This according to the African nationals, results from bad governance on the part of their leaders who they say sign contracts with the aim to bring benefits to them and not to community members that are chief custodians of the resources.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Caretaker Govt approves removal of custodial sentence for small amounts of marijuana

first_img‘Cabinet’ has approved removing custodial sentences for small amounts of marijuana…PPP says Cabinet resigned by law…has no authority to issue orderThe surprise announcement on Tuesday that a ‘Cabinet’ ordered the removal of custodial sentences for persons found in possession of small amounts of marijuana has been described by the People’s Progressive Party (PPP) as both misleading and for political mileage.This is because Cabinet, by law, was supposed to resign after the Government was defeated by a No-Confidence Motion in the National Assembly last year.According to the release from Government, after extensive discussions and reviews, “Cabinet has approved a proposal to remove custodial sentences for persons found to be in possession of 30 grams or less of marijuana”.The PPP, in a statement soon after the announcement, denounced the Government’s actions as nothing more than a “political gimmick”, intended by A Partnership for National Unity/Alliance for Change (APNU/AFC) to trick persons and boost their chances at the early elections that are inevitable.According to the PPP, the APNU/AFC coalition Government is currently illegal and Cabinet should have already resigned, consistent with Article 106 (6) of the Constitution and the recent ruling of the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ). “How then, is Cabinet meeting and making decisions? Does the coalition not intend to comply with the ruling of the Caribbean Court of Justice?” the party questioned.It reminded that the provisions of Article 106 (6) and (7) are clear. It went on to reference the ruling of CCJ President, Justice Adrian Saunders, in the No-Confidence Motion challenge case.“Justice Saunders’ ruling [paragraph three] adds that: “Article 106(6) of the Constitution states that the cabinet, including the president, shall resign if the Government is defeated by the vote of a majority of all the elected members of the National Assembly ‘on a vote of confidence,” the party said.“Additionally, the David Granger-led coalition has had over four years to address the issue of removing custodial sentences for possession of small quantities of marijuana. It failed to do so. The Narcotics Drug and Psychotropic Substances (Control) (Amendment) Bill – a bill to remove custodial sentences for possession of small amounts of marijuana – was brought to the National Assembly since December 10, 2015. The coalition Government refused to debate it.”The party reminded that instead, in May 2016, President Granger declared that: “This is not something that is a preoccupation of the administration at the present time…I would not counsel the use of marijuana by young people or anybody.”According to the PPP, such an announcement is not enforceable without an Act of Parliament. As such, it noted that any talk in the current circumstances of removing custodial sentences is “nothing more than talk”.“It is not a promise fulfilled by the coalition Government. It is a reminder that this is just another promise that was broken. Further, the position of the People’s Progressive Party/ Civic (PPP/C) on this issue has been clear for years now”.The issue of reviewing possession of quantities of marijuana, the party added, which attracts a mandatory, minimum jail sentence, was included in the PPP/C 2015 manifesto and this issue has been used repeatedly by the APNU/AFC Coalition “to secure political mileage, nothing more”.Still an offenceMeanwhile, in its release, the Government had said that narcotics possession remains an offence, but persons will not be sentenced to prison as obtained in the past.“This is the first of several steps that Government intends to take as it considers the recently submitted Caribbean Community (Caricom) Report on the usages of marijuana, and in particular, usages by our Rastafarian brothers and sisters who require it for use in their worship and sacrament”.In the wake of confusion over social media regarding what the directive meant, Government subsequently sent out another statement in which it stated that this is just the first step in the process towards removal of custodial sentences. And it stressed that possession was still illegal.“The draft amendments of the Narcotics Drug and Psychotropic Substances (Control) (Amendment) Bill 2015 were presented to Cabinet meeting in Linden on April 30th, 2019. However, there was a process involved, following which, this information has now been made public. This is the first in a series of actions that have to be taken to ensure the proposed changes are enacted”.“Before a Bill is sent to the National Assembly, it has to be approved by Cabinet. If there are any changes, it is sent to the Attorney General’s Chambers. However, once the final draft has been approved by Cabinet, it is added to the National Assembly’s Order Papers, read, debated and then voted on. The approval of the proposal therefore does not render it law; it is simply the first step”.last_img read more

Riders on the storm

first_imgEnsconced within the steel turret of the Tornado Intercept Vehicle, Casey will dig in and wait as the storm’s furious onslaught churns toward him. “When people see us coming, they know something’s up,” he said, relaxing in his hillside living room in Studio City. “For the first couple years, it was like the carnival freak show was coming to town. Now, they’re cheering us. It’s really awesome.” The filmmaker cuts an interesting figure. Compactly built with thinning, graying hair and a gritty wash of stubble, he favors military attire and a well-worn straw cowboy hat. He removes his shoes inside his home and dips Skoal. He grows organic heirloom tomatoes. His speaking voice is calm and soft. Where to go when you need a tank? STUDIO CITY In a few days, Sean Casey will pack his bags, bid farewell to his family and chart a course for hell. His destination: Tornado Alley. At a time most people in storm country are checking their cellars and planning how to escape the weather, the 39-year-old filmmaker will be racing toward it. He’ll load a crew into a heavily armored pickup truck, prep his IMAX camera and, with luck, drive right into a grinding, destructive funnel. He came to his current vocation in a curious way. In 1998, while shooting a documentary on animal migration on Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean, he got bored. The crabs were slow to spawn, and he found himself with a lot of time on his hands. He went to the local library and found a book on storm chasing. Tantalized by the tales of men and women who drive back roads and dirt trails in search of twisters, he started reading up on the field. He learned of Joshua Wurman, an MIT-educated scientist with the Center for Severe Weather Research in Boulder, Colo. The two met in Oklahoma in May 1999, shortly after an F5 tornado smashed through the region, killing 44 people and inflicting $1.3 billion in damage. Wurman was fascinated by the force of the storms and wanted to find ways to study how they form and how they affect ground structures. Casey was hooked and began following the scientist, using Wurman’s Doppler radar-equipped trucks to get as close to the storms as possible. “You can only get so close in a rented minivan,” Casey said. “You’re always thinking, `How can I get away? How can I get away? Will this dirt road become mud? Will I be stuck?”‘ A regular vehicle had too many liabilities. A baseball-size chunk of hail could punch a hole right through a windshield. A light truck could get knocked on its side in winds above 100 mph. Casey needed a tank. Thus began the TIV. TIV studies twisters from the bottom up In 2003, he bought a six-year-old Ford F-450 diesel pickup for $14,000 and learned how to weld. He stripped the truck down to its chassis, 7.3-liter turbocharged engine, dashboard and steering wheel and began piling on armor. In the past four years, he estimates he’s poured $20,000 into field repairs, replacing nearly every part on the frame. After six weeks of trying and endless hours of research, he figured out how to construct a turret to house his camera. The current iteration looks like something Batman would employ on an urban assault vehicle. “It’s like a demolition derby car and Russian World War I submarine. It’s,” he said, pausing for a few seconds, “robust.” The first year his crew took the vehicle out, they were pulled over 14 times by curious cops. Now it’s a familiar sight from Texas all the way to North Dakota. For two months each year, the TIV rolls up and down the storm corridor, following Wurman’s crews. “If I hadn’t known him, I’d have dismissed him out of hand,” Wurman said. “Even looking at the TIV, you kind of wonder. But I knew him, knew his determination. He wasn’t just a crazy daredevil, so I knew I could work with him.” When Wurman’s instruments find a tornado brewing, Casey’s driver points the TIV’s train-like prow toward the storm and makes a run for it. “We’re driving like hell to get in front of it,” he said. “The storms in April are moving 45 mph and the minute they get behind you, it’s nearly impossible to get them.” When they’re relatively certain where the twister will touch down, the TIV comes to a halt. As the tornado approaches, four hydraulic arms spring out like outriggers, bracing the 14,000-pound vehicle to the ground. Casey engages a series of winches, tightening the suspension springs and laying the TIV’s belly on the ground like a lowrider. In an F2 twister, with winds above 120 mph, the four crew members don’t feel a thing. As he’s scrambling to take a light reading and train his wide-angle lens on the storm for his movie, the TIV’s anemometers and pressure gauges are feeding valuable data back to Wurman. The meteorologist’s instruments can track the storm’s top, but he needs Casey’s unique vantage point to gauge its full power. “We can see 99 percent, but it’s the 1 percent that matters to people,” Wurman said. “That’s the part doing all the destruction, and that’s where we need to know the most about how fast the wind is, how it’s getting sucked in. It really requires data from the lowest zone, and the TIV can go in under the radar.” F5 could take out even the TIV So far, the vehicle has found its way into six tornadoes, two last week when the team made an early run down to Amarillo, Texas. The violent storms claimed 10 lives and left hundreds homeless. Wurman hopes the information gleaned from their research can help develop early warning systems and improve structural design to prevent similar damage in the future. In addition to pitching in on research, Casey hopes to get footage as-yet unseen on screen. If he gets the elusive shot – the perfectly lit, evocative picture of the inside of a tornado – he hopes to finish his film within several years. Though the TIV has survived relatively unscathed its past encounters with the destructive natural monsters, Casey remains mindful that he treads a dangerous course each time he heads into their paths. A dirt road could become a quagmire and a small storm could become an F5. A 200-mph gust could send the tank end-over-end for hundreds of yards, even if it’s snug to the ground. It would become, in his words, a big metal blender. He says he’d be lucky to live. “It’s not like we’re going to Baghdad and patrolling the streets, but there’s danger,” he said. “But sometimes you get the bear … and sometimes the bear gets you.” brent.hopkins@dailynews.com (818) 713-3738 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

Lancaster sweep nails down tie for 2nd in Golden League

first_imgLancaster High’s boys’ tennis team, led by defending Golden League singles champion Duong Thai, beat Palmdale on Tuesday in one of its biggest tests of the season. The Eagles’ victory makes the playoff race a little clearer. They swept the season series with Palmdale, snapping the Falcons’ four-match winning streak, to assure themselves no worse than a tie for second place. Quartz Hill (13-3 overall, 9-0 Golden), which defeated Lancaster twice, extended its league winning streak to 160 matches and closed in on its 16th consecutive title with a victory over Highland. Much of Palmdale’s success under first-year coach John Konrad can be attributed to its doubles play, with Pedro Gonzalez/Jose Gutierrez and Michael Castro/Tyler Coombes recording important victories. Palmdale’s strength was neutralized by the performance of Lancaster’s singles lineup, which helped the Eagles improve to 8-2 in league. erik.boal@dailynews.com (818) 713-3607160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl eventPalmdale, which on April 11 defeated Highland (6-4 in league) for the first time, will have to duplicate the feat in the regular-season finale May 4 to secure third place. The Falcons (6-5, 6-3) outlasted Highland 77-74 on games after the teams played to a 9-9 tie. Business as usual: Many area leagues have structured the final two weeks of their regular-season schedules around the 106th Ojai Valley Tournament, which runs today through Sunday. No Golden League players were selected for the prestigious CIF singles or doubles draws, and that could be beneficial. With rain possible today and Friday, league coaches have stressed the need to complete all matches before the May 8 league tournament at Palmdale High. Seeding is believing: With only a handful of matches left on the schedule, Golden League teams are making every effort to solidify their lineups for the league tournament and Southern Section Div. III playoffs. Lancaster’s Thai and Quartz Hill’s Alex Majd are expected to be the top two seeds in the singles draw. The Rebels could dominate the doubles draw, with Rohit Choudhary and Anish Patel the top seed and Dan Brown and Randy Mang – winners of the Quartz Hill tournament April 15 – the likely No. 2. last_img read more

NORTH WEST 10K – RACE TO PRESS THE RIGHT BUTTONS FOR DONEGAL YOUTH SERVICES!

first_imgMembers of the Donegal Youth Services preparing to fundraise for the North West 10K.The absence of basic I.T. equipment for young people in the 27 Donegal Youth Clubs is hopefully going to be addressed by a fundraising campaign backed by the North West 10k Charity Run and Walk which takes place in Letterkenny on Sunday 3rd of May. None of the centres have laptops or Wifi, which in the modern world is hard to believe. However, that is the reality as the 27 clubs don’t have the money for the equipment as any fundraising initiatives in the local areas goes towards the rent of halls; overheads like heating and lighting; hire of buses and accommodation when attending band or sporting events and for activities like the cinema and bowling.The Donegal Youth Service is the umbrella organization for the 27 clubs, which successfully applied to be one of the four charities to benefit from this year’s North West 10k.The DYS’s Lorraine Thompson says that her committee members were prompted to apply to be a North West 10k beneficiary because of the event’s countywide appeal. And that is something that their own organization hopes to maximize in terms of raising money with clubs in every part of Donegal.All money raised will go directly to the 27 centres around the county with the primary objective of buying laptops and accessing Wifi for use by their young members and for club leaders who are now obliged to do most of the business end of things on-line. There is only a very minimal amount of funding available from central resources for the clubs so local organizers have to fundraise in their own areas to keep the doors open which is a huge challenge in the current climate.“All our clubs are run by volunteers who are out putting on activities one or two nights a week in community or church halls which have to be paid for as well as the heating and lighting costs. Money has to be raised for any activities they take on like going to youth band or sporting competitions. Buses have to be hired and maybe accommodation might have to be paid for depending on where the events are on. Funding is needed even for trips to the cinema or bowling” Ms Thompson.The Youth Clubs cater for the age group 5-25 years mainly for after-schools activities. The Donegal Youth Service provides leadership programmes, child protection training and Garda vetting advice to the volunteers who run the centres. DYS was first setup in 1981 with a small office at the top of Letterkenny’s Market Square. Now the organization has 14 staff and a further 18 are involved in the clubs around the county under the Community Employment Scheme.“If children are not into sport parents come together and approach us for help in setting up a Youth Club. We give support with recruiting, training, policies and procedures, health and safety, which are all needed to run a club. The money raised from the North West 10k will go directly to the clubs for the purchase of laptops and to access Wifi for the youth club members. The volunteers also need the laptops as so much has to be done on-line now in terms of making applications and other work” Ms Thompson said.In addition to the 27 centres around the county the Donegal Youth Service also has The Loft on Letterkenny’s Port Road, which is funded by the HSE and caters for 12-18 year olds. It is a drop-in centre that offers group activities and 1:1 support to young people. The facility also has a Youth Information Centre funded by the Department of Youth & Child Affairs whose remit is looking after the 12-25 years age group and adults who support them. It provides information regarding work, accommodation, education, travel, cyber bullying and parent training.The Port Road centre also has the Day Break programme for young people between the ages of 12 and 15 who have left school early catering for an average of six daily and offering support with improving skills in numeracy and literacy, communications and life skills. The Day Break service is also available one day a week in Ballybofey. The Donegal Youth Service also runs the Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender drop-in centre in Letterkenny and an outreach service in Ballybofey. Teen Talk a free ‘listening ear service’ is also provided for young people who experience difficulties at school or in the home and want someone to talk to in a 1:1 situation.So now with just over five weeks to go to the big North West 10k Charity Run & Walk the Donegal Youth Services and its 27 centres are busy with the main fundraising venture which is the sponsorship cards. Hundreds of cards have been distributed throughout the county and more are available. So take one from the clubs, do the walk or run and support this very worthy cause. Sponsorship cards are also available from Letterkenny Chamber and for further details on the 19th North West 10k go to “http://www.northwest10k.com” www.northwest10k.com. The North West 10k is being kindly sponsored again this year by Brian McCormick Sports & Leisure and DonegalDaily.com.NORTH WEST 10K – RACE TO PRESS THE RIGHT BUTTONS FOR DONEGAL YOUTH SERVICES! was last modified: April 5th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

FOOTBALL: ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUE SEASON GETS UNDERWAY THIS WEEKEND

first_imgThe Ulster Senior League season begins in earnest this week with the first round of games in the Donegal News League Cup.Holders, Letterkenny Rovers will play in Group B along with League Champions Derry City Reserves and last year’s League runners-up Cockhill Celtic. The line up in Group B is completed with Swilly Rovers who finished in 4th place last season so this is certainly a tough looking group. Meanwhile over in Group A last year’s Donegal News League Cup runners-up, Drumkeen Utd. are joined by the league’s most successful side, Fanad Utd., Kildrum Tigers, last year’s Knockalla Cup winners and new boys, Finn Harps Reserves. The games get underway in Group B on Saturday evening at the Charlie O’Donnell Sports Grounds in Cockhill with Celtic facing Jason Gibson’s Swilly Rovers at 6:30pm. The home side will be favourites to shade it despite last week’s setback in the Knockalla Caravan’s Cup against Drumkeen.There are three games down for decision on Sunday afternoon with holders Letterkenny Rovers taking on League Champions Derry City at Leckview Park in the other Group B tie. Rovers had to rely on penalties to get past Donegal League leaders, Glenea Utd. last week in the Knockalla Cup while Derry had a comfortable passage to the quarter-finals after a 4-0 victory over Moville Celtic and they will start favourites in Letterkenny. Fanad Utd. host Bonagee in Group A and Ollie Horgan’s men will look to bounce back from what was for them a down season last year. They have lost several influential players to begin the season and Sean Sandilands will be hopeful that Bonagee can spring a surprise in this one.The other Group A game down for decision this Sunday see’s last year’s runners-up, Drumkeen play host to Maurice Toland’s Kildrum Tigers. Both teams had good wins in last week’s cup games with Drumkeen overcoming the challenge of Cockhill and the Tigers seeing of a Milford Utd. team that had been in very good form by an impressive score of 3-0. Drumkeen have proven very difficult to beat at home in cup games in recent seasons so a draw would be no surprise here. Saturday, April 13th at 6:30pmGroup BCockhill Celtic v Swill Rovers Ref. P. DuddySunday, April 14th at 2pmGroup ADrumkeen Utd. v Kildrum Tigers Ref. V. McLaughlin Group BLetterkenny Rovers v Derry City Ref. P. CollTuesday, April 16th at 7:30pmGroup A Fanad Utd. v Bonagee Utd. Ref. T. McAreeFOOTBALL: ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUE SEASON GETS UNDERWAY THIS WEEKEND was last modified: April 13th, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:FOOTBALL: ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUE SEASON GETS UNDERWAY THIS WEEKENDlast_img read more

Giants send Pomeranz to the bullpen, Williamson elects free agency

first_imgBALTIMORE — Drew Pomeranz is no longer a member of the San Francisco Giants’ starting rotation.Mac Williamson is no longer a member of the Giants’ organization.Minutes after manager Bruce Bochy revealed that Pomeranz’s next start would be skipped and the left-hander will be used in relief, the Giants announced that Williamson cleared waivers and has elected free agency.Neither news item comes as a surprise as Pomeranz has struggled in each of his past five starts while Williamson went …last_img

Crows Use Tools on Tools

first_imgCrows can use one tool on another to get food.  A report in Science Daily says they appear to use analogical reasoning, not just trial and error, to figure out how to manipulate objects.  They used a short stick to get a longer stick out of a toolbox in order to reach a snack too far for the short tool.  In this, “The birds’ tool-use skills rival those seen among great apes, according to the researchers” at University of Auckland.    Analogical reasoning was thought to be at the core of human innovation.  One said, “It was surprising to find that these ‘bird-brained’ creatures performed at the same levels as the best performances by great apes on such a difficult problem.”Let’s be good empirical Darwinists and take the evidence where it leads.  Chimps evolved into birds, which evolved into humans.  Mustn’t let species bias cloud our reasoning, now.  Darwinists have made a big deal over intelligence as evidence of our evolutionary kinship to apes.  Now, having to eat crow at this finding, they must be feeling in the mood for some Old Crow at the Crow Bar.(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Chinese Flood Legend Was Historic

first_imgA dam breach flood in China known only from legend appears to be supported by geological evidence.National Geographic reminds its readers that the stuff of legend can sometimes have a historical basis. According to Chinese legend, about 4,000 years ago a river dried up after an earthquake. Later, a great flood occurred. A hero named Yu helped the people recover, founding the Xia dynasty, a turning point in Chinese history. NG says that there has been “considerable debate” whether Xia existed. Now, geologists have found evidence for a megaflood on the Yellow River.When that dam finally burst and the river broke free, a massive flood raged across the countryside—and potentially altered the course of Chinese history.That’s the story told by sediments and archaeological remains described Thursday in a provocative new study published in Science. If correct, the geologic evidence provides a kernel of truth to one of the country’s most important legends: a great flood that paved the way for the Xia, China’s semi-mythical first dynasty.Live Science, the BBC News, and New Scientist also reported the story.Other historical dam breach floods are well known. Some were witnessed by humans, like Gros Ventre in Wyoming and Canyon Lake in Texas (6/21/10). Others have been inferred by circumstantial evidence, such as the Channeled Scablands in Washington, and one in Argentina (2/18/16).  The power and speed of a dam breach is often underestimated. After decades of debate, for instance, some geologists have come to believe that the Grand Canyon, or at least a portion of it, was carved by a dam breach flood (10/27/13).National Geographic took the opportunity to compare the Chinese flood to Noah’s flood:Its importance is just like the story of Noah’s flood in the Western world,” says study leader Qinglong Wu of China’s Peking University.While this might suggest that they believe Noah’s flood is an exaggerated legend of a local event, the BBC News pointed out that “Different flood legends exist in many cultures around the world.”The known and inferred dam breach events are all post-Flood in the Biblical timeframe. Noah’s Flood had a different source, mechanism and scale. What we learn from the local floods is the power of moving water. Instead of downgrading the Genesis account to fit local floods, as Robert Ballard did with the Black Sea hypothesis (9/10/07), could the worldwide memories of large floods be upgraded to a global flood? Which account is the truth, and which is the legend?Modern secular materialists want to present themselves as the wise men of our age. Part of their narrative is to make ancient people look gullible and stupid, only able to get their stories partly right until scientists came along to tell what really happened. Peter said, however, that their scoffing attitude is due to willful ignorance of the Great Flood described in Genesis 6-9. It’s not like they lack evidence: worldwide megasequences of sediments, pure quartz layers over vast areas (6/27/03), the fossil record, seashells on the highest mountains, flat sediments over hundreds of square miles, massive folds in strata, the mid-oceanic ridge, and more.Historical records are more a function of honesty than intelligence. Ancient peoples were smart, but they were also sinners like us. We know ancient kings exaggerated their exploits to maintain power and prestige. Biblical writers, by contrast, are scrupulously honest about the misdeeds of the powerful. Why would they record their own sins for posterity unless God directed them? The Biblical Flood account, too, is remarkable for its detail. It doesn’t say “Once upon a time” but “In the six hundredth year of Noah’s life, in the second month, on the 17th day of the month, all the fountains of the great deep burst forth”  (Genesis 7:11). Legends can be corrupted by verbal transmission over centuries, but the Biblical records were likely written down by eyewitness very early and passed down through the patriarchs till Moses compiled them. The Biblical authors all affirm divine inspiration. God preserved His word for the ages to come, so that all might know the history of the world. It takes willful unbelief to deny it.We know what water can do by observation; there’s no limit to how its destructive power can be scaled up, given sufficient water and forces to move it. The skeptics were wrong about the Chinese flood. We would hope the long list of occasions when geologists were proven wrong about other phenomena (e.g., 7/08/16) might make them a little more humble before relegating Noah’s account to mere legend. (Visited 62 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more