Arsenal vow to pay all staff until end of April despite no Premier League football

first_img Metro Sport ReporterMonday 23 Mar 2020 1:16 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.5kShares Advertisement Advertisement Arsenal vow to pay all staff until end of April despite no Premier League football Arsenal will continue paying their staff (Picture: Copa/Getty)Arsenal will continue to pay all of their matchday and non-matchday staff until April 30, despite there being no matches due to the coronavirus crisis.There will be no Premier League football until April 30 at the earliest, leaving football club employees – both part-time and full-time – without work during the pandemic.But Arsenal have made a move to ease the financial concerns of their staff by vowing to pay them all even without matches taking place.Arsenal’s managing director Vinai Venkatesham said in a statement: ‘We are truly grateful for the outstanding efforts of all our staff across the club every day. AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTRead the latest updates: Coronavirus news live‘We rely on their tireless service to provide a first-class experience for our fans on matchdays and non-matchdays.‘These are challenging times for everyone, but in particular our casual workers. This gesture is intended to ease their financial uncertainty while football is currently suspended to 30 April 2020. Comment Vinai Venkatesham announced the move (Picture: Getty)‘We are truly grateful for the outstanding efforts of all our staff across the club every day. We rely on their tireless service to provide a first-class experience for our fans, on matchdays and non-matchdays.‘We look forward to welcoming football back to Emirates Stadium as soon as possible.’Arsenal players, meanwhile, will not return to training as was initially planned on Tuesday, although manager Mikel Arteta has recovered from coronavirus.Follow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page.last_img read more

Bombers drop opener, Lewis scores equalizer in 1-1 tie against Aldergrove

first_imgThe worst possible nightmare came true for the L.V. Rogers Bombers at the B.C. High School AA Boy’s Soccer Championships.A tired and weary Bomber squad, fresh from a weekend Whitecaps Regional camp, fell 3-0 to Okanagan Mission to open the 16-team tournament Monday in Burnaby.LVR managed to bounce back in game two, riding a Ryan Lewis goal to tie Aldergrove 1-1.”Got (to Burnaby) at 2 a.m. (Monday),” said coach Dave Spendlove, who along with son Jamie, form the sideline staff of the Kootenay champs.”It rained non stop and the boys did not play well losing the first game to Kelowna.”The Bomber worlds collided last week when tournament organizers moved up the AA championships two days. The decision meant most of the Bombers would be in Vernon Saturday and Sunday for the Caps training before traveling late Sunday night for the Lower Mainland. Added to the bad luck was the fact LVR was scheduled to open the tournament Monday at 9:30 a.m.”Against Kelowna we started off like deer in the headlights but came into the game and should have gone in half time two goals up,” Spendlove explained.In the second half, however, it was Kelowna going up early after LVR failed to clear the ball properly following an Okanagan Mission corner.OKM scored twice on defensive errors by the Bombers to put the game away. The goals cam after LVR missed on a three-on-one opportunity.Game two started like game one ended with Aldergrove granted a gift goal to open the contest.That was it for Aldergrove as the Bombers took over the game, pressuring the Fraser Valley team the rest of the game.The tying marker came following a six-way passing play with Lewis calmly depositing the ball into the vacant net.LVR returns to the pitch Tuesday to conclude the round robin draw with a game against West Van’s Sentinel.The playoff round follows Tuesday afternoon with the final seeding games set for Wednesday.last_img read more

Selkirk Saints pull off weekend exhibition sweep of UVic Vikes

first_imgThe Selkirk Saints tuned up for start of the BC Intercollegiate Hockey League by sweeping a pair of exhibition games against the University of Victoria Vikes this weekend at the NDCC Arena.The Saints opened with a 6-3 win Friday before closing out the two-game set by defeating the Vikes 5-3 Saturday.Dallas Calvin, of Beaver Valley Nitehawk fame, led the scoring for three-time defending BCIHL champs with goals in each of the two games.Three former members of the KIJHL Nelson Leafs are on the roster for UVic. Forwards Carsen Willans and Linden Horswill and defenceman Austin Seaman are entering their second season of BCIHL play with UVic, which opened the scoring in the two gamesSelkirk concludes the BCIHL exhibition season with a 3-3-1 record.The Saints open the 2015-16 BCIHL season Friday at the Castlegar Arena when Trinity Western University Spartans come to the Sunflower City.The teams play the second game of the weekend set Saturday in Castlegar. Puck drop for both days are at 7 p.m.The Saints will raise the 2015 Championship Banner during a special pre-game ceremony.UVic travels to Eastern Washington outside of Spokane to begin the regular season.The BCIHL was launched in 2006 and now includes five member teams: Eastern Washington University, Selkirk College, Simon Fraser University, Trinity Western University and the University of Victoria.last_img read more

Ostrich chases cyclists in Cape Town

first_imgCyclists training for the prestigious Cape Town Cycle Tour were joined by a speeding ostrich. Oleksiy Mishchenko captured the precious footage on his head cam. The clip has gone viral globally and has received over a million views on YouTube already. Cyclists training on Cape Town’s roads are joined by an ostrich on 5 March 2016. (Image: Screengrab via Youtube, Oleksiy Mishchenko, Viralhog) • Tourists watch as buffalo burst tyre to chase lions away  • Crowdsourcing the Serengeti: citizen scientists classify millions of photos online  • When on an African safari, lock your doors  • Cyclists tour and train in South Africa’s green oasis • Sanlam Cape Town Marathon goes silver Priya PitamberWhen a group of cyclists took to the streets of the Mother City to train for the Cape Town Cycle Tour, held on 6 March, they saw more than they bargained for when an ostrich decided to join them.Filmed by cyclist Oleksiy Mishchenko on 5 March, equipped with a head cam, the footage has already gone viral and has racked up over a million views on YouTube.“The road by the ocean side was quiet and a little deserted,” described Mishchenko about the road conditions.He spotted the ostrich, which gave chase to his friends. He admitted he was scared at first, but then he thought he was going to fall off his bike with laughter.“The ostrich didn’t have any problem to keep up at 50km/h and apparently they do 70km/h with no sweat,” he wrote.“Luckily the creature decided to leave us alone, as we were running out of road.”Watch the hilarious clip:Canadian Cycling Magazine noted this was not the first time animals and cyclists had met on the road. “At last year’s Tour de France, Warren Barguil of Giant-Alpecin was one of several cyclists who threaded through the unanticipated obstacle of a herd of cows,” its website reads http://cyclingmagazine.ca/sections/news/cyclists-in-south-africa-embark-on-the-training-ride-of-all-time-thanks-to-an-ostrich/. “Horses, too, have proven themselves avid followers of the pro peloton – literally, like at the Tour de Suisse or the 1997 Critérium International.”Amused viewers tweeted their comments:Ostrich thinks he’s a cyclist! He just wants to be one of the gang.. #ConfusedIdentity #OnlyInSA #LoveSouthAfrica https://t.co/en9bykadrz— Riverlodge Cape Town (@CapeRiverlodge) March 7, 2016 The ostrich was angry because the cyclist cut it off a few kilometers back #TheProjectTV— #TheProjectTV (@theprojecttv) March 7, 2016 I just watched a video of an ostrich chasing a cyclist.. I cry laughed— Stacey (@_staceystewart) March 6, 2016 #Cyclist chased by #Ostrich! That would certainly make me pedal faster! https://t.co/C0FEjNtVMh— Lucy (@lil_lucy_d) March 5, 2016last_img read more

Bill Gates: Who says Africa will always be poor?

first_imgBill Gates in Acrra, Ghana, in 2013. “A growing number of countries in Africa are building community health systems, which are extremely cost-effective,” he writes. (Image: Gates Foundation)• Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation(206) [email protected]: If you are a member of the news media, please use the phone number or email address above to leave a detailed message. Include your name, press affiliation, phone number, questions, and deadline.“Poor countries are doomed to stay poor.” That’s a myth Bill Gates passionately debunks. The founder of Microsoft, one of the richest men in the world and, today, co-founder – with his wife Melinda – of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Gates has released a letter that explains why pessimism about the future of poor countries holds back their development.In previous years the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation annual letter discussed the foundation’s work. In the 2014 edition of the letter, the Gateses chose instead to focus on three major global myths, erroneous ideas held by many in the world that hold back the upliftment of poor people everywhere.The letter is in three parts, challenging three persistent myths about global poverty: that poor countries are doomed to stay poor, that foreign aid is a big waste, and that saving lives leads to overpopulation. Read the annual letter on the Gates Foundation website.We bring you the full text of the first part of the letter, which specifically discusses Africa.Myth: Poor countries are doomed to stay poorBy Bill GatesI’ve heard this myth stated about lots of places, but most often about Africa. A quick web search will turn up dozens of headlines and book titles such as “How Rich Countries Got Rich and Why Poor Countries Stay Poor”.Thankfully these books are not bestsellers, because the basic premise is false. The fact is, incomes and other measures of human welfare are rising almost everywhere, including in Africa.So why is this myth so deeply ingrained?I’ll get to Africa in a moment, but first let’s look at the broader trend around the world, going back a half-century. Fifty years ago, the world was divided in three: the United States and our Western allies; the Soviet Union and its allies; and everyone else. I was born in 1955 and grew up learning that the so-called First World was well off or “developed.” Most everyone in the First World went to school, and we lived long lives. We weren’t sure what life was like behind the Iron Curtain, but it sounded like a scary place. Then there was the so-called Third World – basically everyone else. As far as we knew, it was filled with people who were poor, didn’t go to school much, and died young. Worse, they were trapped in poverty, with no hope of moving up.The statistics bear out these impressions. In 1960, almost all of the global economy was in the West. Per capita income in the United States was about $15 000 a year.1 (That’s income per person, so $60 000 a year for a family of four.) Across Asia, Africa, and Latin America, incomes per person were far lower. Brazil: $1,982. China: $928. Botswana: $383. And so on.Watch the video:Years later, I would see this disparity myself when I travelled. Melinda and I visited Mexico City in 1987 and were surprised by the poverty we witnessed. There was no running water in most homes, so we saw people trekking long distances by bike or on foot to fill up water jugs. It reminded us of scenes we had seen in rural Africa. The guy who ran Microsoft’s Mexico City office would send his kids back to the United States for checkups to make sure the smog wasn’t making them sick.Today, the city is mind-blowingly different. Its air is as clean as Los Angeles’ (which isn’t great, but certainly an improvement from 1987). There are high-rise buildings, new roads, and modern bridges. There are still slums and pockets of poverty, but by and large when I visit there now I think, “Wow, most people who live here are middle-class. What a miracle.”The global picture of poverty has been completely redrawn in my lifetime. Per-person incomes in Turkey and Chile are where the United States level was in 1960. Malaysia is nearly there, as is Gabon. And that no-man’s-land between rich and poor countries has been filled in by China, India, Brazil, and others. Since 1960, China’s real income per person has gone up eightfold. India’s has quadrupled, Brazil’s has almost quintupled, and the small country of Botswana, with shrewd management of its mineral resources, has seen a thirty-fold increase. There is a class of nations in the middle that barely existed 50 years ago, and it includes more than half of the world’s population.Here’s another way to see the transition – by counting people instead of countries: So the easiest way to respond to the myth that poor countries are doomed to stay poor is to point to one fact: They haven’t stayed poor. Many – though by no means all – of the countries we used to call poor now have thriving economies. And the percentage of very poor people has dropped by more than half since 1990.That still leaves more than one billion people in extreme poverty, so it’s not time to celebrate. But it is fair to say that the world has changed so much that the terms “developing countries” and “developed countries” have outlived their usefulness.Any category that lumps China and the Democratic Republic of Congo together confuses more than it clarifies. Some so-called developing countries have come so far that it’s fair to say they have developed. A handful of failed states are hardly developing at all. Most countries are somewhere in the middle. That’s why it’s more instructive to think about countries as low-, middle-, or high-income. (Some experts even divide middle-income into two sub-categories: lower-middle and upper-middle.)‘Life in Africa never gets better’With that in mind, I’ll turn back to the more specific and pernicious version of this myth: “Sure, the Asian tigers are doing fine, but life in Africa never gets better, and it never will.”First, don’t let anyone tell you that Africa is worse off today than it was 50 years ago. Income per person has in fact risen in sub-Saharan Africa over that time, and quite a bit in a few countries. After plummeting during the debt crisis of the 1980s, it has climbed by two thirds since 1998, to nearly $2 200 from just over $1 300. Today, more and more countries are turning toward strong sustained development, and more will follow. Seven of the 10 fastest-growing economies of the past half-decade are in Africa.Africa has also made big strides in health and education. Since 1960, the life span for women in sub-Saharan Africa has gone up from 41 to 57 years, despite the HIV epidemic. Without HIV it would be 61 years. The percentage of children in school has gone from the low 40s to over 75% since 1970. Fewer people are hungry, and more people have good nutrition. If getting enough to eat, going to school, and living longer are measures of a good life, then life is definitely getting better there. These improvements are not the end of the story; they’re the foundation for more progress.Of course, these regional averages obscure big differences among countries. In Ethiopia, income is only $800 a year per person. In Botswana it’s nearly $12 000. You see this huge variation within countries too: Life in a major urban area like Nairobi looks nothing like life in a rural Kenyan village. You should look sceptically at anyone who treats an entire continent as an undifferentiated mass of poverty and disease.The bottom line: Poor countries are not doomed to stay poor. Some of the so-called developing nations have already developed. Many more are on their way. The nations that are still finding their way are not trying to do something unprecedented. They have good examples to learn from.I am optimistic enough about this that I am willing to make a prediction. By 2035, there will be almost no poor countries left in the world. (I mean by our current definition of poor.)2 Almost all countries will be what we now call lower-middle income or richer. Countries will learn from their most productive neighbours and benefit from innovations like new vaccines, better seeds, and the digital revolution. Their labour forces, buoyed by expanded education, will attract new investments.A few countries will be held back by war, politics (North Korea, barring a big change there), or geography (landlocked nations in central Africa). And inequality will still be a problem: There will be poor people in every region.But most of them will live in countries that are self-sufficient. Every nation in South America, Asia, and Central America (with the possible exception of Haiti), and most in coastal Africa, will have joined the ranks of today’s middle-income nations. More than 70% of countries will have a higher per-person income than China does today. Nearly 90% will have a higher income than India does today.It will be a remarkable achievement. When I was born, most countries in the world were poor. In the next two decades, desperately poor countries will become the exception rather than the rule. Billions of people will have been lifted out of extreme poverty. The idea that this will happen within my lifetime is simply amazing to me.Some people will say that helping almost every country develop to middle-income status will not solve all the world’s problems and will even exacerbate some. It is true that we’ll need to develop cheaper, cleaner sources of energy to keep all this growth from making the climate and environment worse. We will also need to solve the problems that come with affluence, like higher rates of diabetes. However, as more people are educated, they will contribute to solving these problems. Bringing the development agenda near to completion will do more to improve human lives than anything else we do. [1] Calculating GDP is an inexact science with a lot of room for error and disagreement. For the sake of consistency, throughout this letter I’ll use GDP per capita figures from the Penn World Table, adjusted for inflation to 2005 dollars. And for the sake of simplicity, I’ll call it “income per person.” [RETURN][2] Specifically, I mean that by 2035, almost no country will be as poor as any of the 35 countries that the World Bank classifies as low-income today, even after adjusting for inflation. [RETURN]last_img read more

Join the 2015 South African Competitiveness Forum

first_imgBrand South Africa will host its second South African Competitiveness Forum (SACF) in Johannesburg in early 2015 under the theme “Active citizenship and its role in changing the South African brand reality”.Top minds from business, government, civil society and the academic world will come together to discuss our position in the world, and uncover ways to give South Africa a competitive edge on the global stage.At the forum Brand South Africa will ask participants to give their views on a number of themes, from youth and innovation to foreign direct investment, the labour market, expansion into the rest of Africa, and active citizenship.A first at the next forum is a session on expatriate South Africans, which aims to explore ways Brand South Africa, business and civil society can work with South Africans living abroad to tell the country’s story, and improve South Africa’s global reputation.Other exciting sessions include a workshop on the nation brand’s “outgoing strategy”. This will focus on business expansion strategy into African markets, and the role perceptions and reputation plays when entering peer markets elsewhere on the continent. Guest speakers from Kenya and Nigeria will give insight into South Africa’s place in these markets.For more information contact Dr Petrus de Kock, research manager at Brand South Africa, at [email protected] theme: Active citizenship and its role in changing the South African brand realityDownload documentThe theme of the second forum is focused on two concepts: active citizenship and the nation brand. The comprehensive research and outcome report from the 2013 SACF highlights insights Brand South Africa uncovered in the process. The feedback from SACF 2013 participants will inform the approach in the next SACF.Workshop 1 – Global South Africans playing their part in creating a competitive and reputable nation brandThe first workshop will not only discuss the overall theme of the second SACF – active citizenship and its role in changing the South African brand reality – but also examine what global South Africans are already doing to promote the nation brand. How can Brand South Africa and South African expatriates work closer together to better tell the South African story globally? How can global South Africans help in achieving the goals of the National Development Plan?Workshop 2 – Youth, innovation and nation brand competitivenessBased on consultations with youth organisations, this workshop will focus on active citizenship and the nation brand, existing projects that align with the NDP, small business support and business development, and social issues that impact development, particularly in townships and rural areas.Workshop 3 – Internal and foreign direct investmentSouth Africa is the continent’s top destination for foreign direct investment. But what are the issues that impact on perceptions of South Africa as FDI destination and trade partner? This workshop will look at support for entrepreneurship and innovation, case studies and experiences of multinationals invested and active in the South African market, existing projects that align to the NDP, and small business support and business development.Workshop 4 – Education and skillsThis session will assemble representatives from the Department of Basic Education, as well as head teachers and civil society organisations involved in education to gain insight on South Africa’s educational strengths and weaknesses. The session will focus on partnerships for enhancing education quality and relevance to the South African economy. Important issues regarding perceptions of the education system and their implications for the country’s reputation will also be discussed.Workshop 5 – South Africa @ Work: the role of labour in creating a new brand realityThis session will gather representatives from South African trade unions to identify the unique features, selling points and stories of South Africa @ Work. It is critical for Brand South Africa to gain insight on case studies of the contribution labour makes and how it can change the South African brand reality.Workshop 6 – The nation brand’s ‘going out’ strategyThe second day of the SACF will open with a workshop on taking the nation brand into international markets. The session will look at the challenges and opportunities for increased cooperation between government, business, and civil society on carrying the message of South Africa into international market spaces. The session will focus on South Africa’s reputation in, exposure to, and interaction with key BRICS and African markets.last_img read more

Rohit Sharma signs as Brand Ambassador for Hublot watches

first_imgNew Delhi, May 2 (PTI) Star Indian opener Rohit Sharma today became the Brand Ambassador of world famous watch brand Hublot becoming second renowned cricketer after former Australian captain Michael Clarke to be associated with the brand. Rohit will be seen promoting the companys signature Classic Fusion Aerofusion Chronograph edition in the coming days. It has been created to celebrate the sport of cricket. “I have always been a watch fanatic; so being associated with a brand like Hublot is an absolute delight. They create some incredible timepieces, unique and different, so to be on their roster and them on mine is incredible. Their involvement in sport has been remarkable, so that makes our association even more exciting,” said Rohit. Hublot on their part expressed their excitement to be associated with the stylish Mumbai batsman who has the highest individual ODI score to his credit and is among the top-10 ODI batsmen in the ICC list. “Hublot sees a lot of common between the Brand and Rohit Sharma as he combines traditional batting technique with entertainment,” a press release stated. PTI KHS PDS KHSlast_img read more

Rigol introduces RSA5000 family of real-time spectrum analyzers

first_img Continue Reading Previous Silicon Labs: PoE ICs target IP cameras, wireless access points, IP phones and smart lightingNext FRAMOS: ruggedized machine vision lenses minimize image aberration RIGOL Technologies introduces the new RSA5000 real-time spectrum analyzers to complement the DSA800-TG family of low-cost spectrum analyzers. The devices are based on the new Rigol-developed Ultra-Real technology as a complete platform, which also allows to perform real-time measurements. The RSA5000 series features a compact, elegant design, touch-screen operation and a wide range of applications, and can also be used as a scalar network analyzer thanks to the additional 3.2 / 6.5 GHz tracking generator. RIGOL’s RSA50xx-TG real-time spectrum analyzer provides a cost-effective alternative for users with demanding analysis tasks and limited budgets at the same time. This fully featured instrument features fully digital Intermediate Frequency (IF) technology for accurate and high-resolution measurements from 9 kHz to 3.2 GHz and 6.5 GHz respectively.The modular RSA5000 series includes the functions:RTSA – Real-time spectrum analyzer up to a maximum bandwidth of 40 MHzGPSA – Spectrum Analyzer with outstanding performanceEMI – Pre-compliance tests according to CISPR specifications (with the software S1210)VSA – Digital Demodulation (option planned in Q2 / 2018)The real-time bandwidth is 25 MHz by default and can be optionally extended to 40 MHz. Thus, the device can be flexibly adapted to customer requirements. Due to the very fast FFT calculation, the device can achieve a 100% detection probability with correct amplitude (POI – Probability of Intercept) of 7.45 μs. The device can still detect smallest signals up to 25 ns. Thus, it is possible to detect signals that cannot be measured with a normal spectrum analyzer.Due to the resulting high information content, different measurements such as a density representation of the frequency, a spectrogram or time range can be displayed, even simultaneously. The versatile frequency mask trigger (FMT) can also detect difficult signals. Using different filter types and six different RBW widths, the device can be optimally adjusted to the respective application. Further details include the FFT rate of up to 146.484 FFT/s, an integrated FMT and power trigger as well as interfaces for USB, LAN, HDMI and GPIB (optional).A spectrum analyzer is used to represent signal amplitudes as a function of frequency and provides the user with a choice of IF filters to reduce the displayed bandwidth and isolate a dedicated signal from the surrounding noise. The RSA5000 Spectrum Analyzer’s digital IF technology significantly reduces the amplitude variations over time and frequency compared to analog filters. The effective measuring speed is more than twice as fast as with the DSA800 series.With add-on options such as the EMI filter & quasi-peak kit, preamp, and expandable measurement capabilities, the RSA5065-TG is ideal for pre-compliance testing of assemblies, devices, and components while capturing rapidly changing signals. This means that the customer can already carry out very cost-effective pre-tests in-house before the products are passed on to the usually very cost-intensive EMC final test to external, certified test laboratories. During product development, in-house pre-tests ensure that the product meets EU standards for EMC, which are mandatory in all EU countries and other European countries.The RSA5000 has a 10.1″ capacitive multi-touch display with 800 x 480 pixel resolution and receives its input signals via a 50 Ω Type N socket. Connections to a PC are possible via Ethernet LAN and USB as well as optionally via GPIB. The optional tracking generator of the RSA5000-TG provides -40 to 0 dBm output power with ± 3 dB output flatness from 1 MHz to 6.5 GHz for VSWR measurements or scalar analysis.Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: Tools & Software last_img read more