San Diego gas prices rise for the 27th consecutive day

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO ( KUSI) – The average price of a gallon of self-serve regular gasoline in San Diego County rose today for the 27th consecutive day, increasing 1.5 cents to $4.039, its highest amount since July 30, 2015.The average price has risen 33 of the past 34 days, increasing 71.7 cents, including 3.3 cents on Saturday, according to figures from the AAA and Oil Price Information Service. It is 22.5 cents more than one week ago, 70.4 cents higher than one month ago and 46.4 cents greater than one year ago. The recent sharp increases are the result of a series of refinery issues that have reduced supply, according to Jeffrey Spring, the Automobile Club of Southern California’s corporate communications manager.“Out of the 10 major refineries in California, six are dealing with planned maintenance, unplanned breakdowns or both, and four of those refineries are in Southern California,” Spring said.“(Wednesday’s) report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration indicated that Los Angeles gasoline inventories dropped by about two million barrels, and a source reported to Oil Price Information Service that Southern California received no imported gasoline in the last week. Because demand also typically increases at this time of year, this has posed seriousconcerns for supply.” KUSI Newsroom, April 14, 2019 Posted: April 14, 2019 San Diego gas prices rise for the 27th consecutive day KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Microsoft Has Its Own Venture Capitalism Division

first_img 2 min read May 31, 2016 This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now This story originally appeared on Engadget Enroll Now for Free Microsoft has started its own venture capital division. The new group is called Microsoft Ventures, and it will focus on early-stage startup investments. Confusingly, Microsoft Ventures was already the name of a startup accelerator initiative at Microsoft, and that group is being rebranded as “Microsoft Accelerator” — one of the problems with having a massive, 41-year-old company is running out of names, apparently.In an article announcing the change, Nagraj Kashyap, the corporate vice president of the new Microsoft Ventures, says that while the company has done a lot of investment in the past, it’s not been focused on early stage, instead investing alongside commercial deals. The new division will be more like Google Ventures, which takes risks on young companies for a potentially huge return.One company that Microsoft invested in early was Facebook, which it pumped $250 million into back in 2007. But that was an investment in preferred stock at a $15 billion valuation, and more about ad sales than venture capitalism.The new division will have an initial presence in San Francisco, Seattle, New York City, and Tel Aviv, Israel. “…We were not a part of the early industry conversations on disruptive technology trends,” said Kashyap, but “with a formalized venture fund, Microsoft now has a seat at the table.” Expect to see Microsoft to invest in more companies at a nascent stage, especially those focused on those that complement the company’s existing products and services, and those focused on machine learning and security.While the announcement talks a good talk, it’s not clear how much this is a rebrand and reorganization vs. a real effort to step up investment. Kashyap said that the division is “not aiming to hit a specific number of investments annually,” but “in the coming days and weeks ahead and beyond, you will see us showing up as an investor in companies that complement these spaces and those that aim to disrupt how business is done today.”last_img read more

California Lawmakers Just Made It Harder for Companies to Sell Your Data

first_img Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. How Success Happens The ruling is in: The Golden State will adopt the California Consumer Privacy Act. The law will give residents the right to know what kind of data companies have collected of theirs and to be able to tell said firms to not sell it.As The Washington Post reports, the passage will give users the ability to opt out of having their data sold, and that services and firms won’t be able to charge a fee or give them inferior service as a result. It also will result in the state’s attorney general having the ability to levy fines against outfits that don’t secure user information against hackers.#AB375 passes off the Assembly Floor with bipartisan support and is headed to the @JerryBrownGov for his signature. #CaCPA2018 #CaLeg #Privacy pic.twitter.com/Z6G7EUGuH7— Ed Chau (@AsmEdChau) June 28, 2018Much like we saw with the GDPR ruling in March, this passage could impact users on a global scale. As you can imagine, there are a lot of eyes on this bit of legislation. Now that it has passed, there’s a six-month period for the collective tech industry (under the auspice of the Internet Association) to try and make changes to the bill before it becomes law next Jan. 1.However, the passage of this means an even more stringent version of a bill won’t appear on the November ballot. That one, led by real estate developer Alastair Mactaggart, would grant local citizens to sue companies “in almost any case” where their data had been breached. It was seen as a step too far.The Internet Association admitted that while the bill that was passed today had “many problematic provisions,” according to WaPo, its members wouldn’t obstruct or block the bill from moving forward. That’s because it meant Mactaggart’s wouldn’t appear on the ballot.Last month, it was discovered that Amazon, Google, Microsoft and Uber pledged money to fight the law. AT&T, Facebook, Google and Engadget parent company Verizon all plunked down $200,000 each for the fund, while Amazon and Microsoft contributed $195,000 each.Uber ponied up a paltry $50,000. In February, the ride-hailing service paid out $245 million to Waymo over stolen trade secrets. Eventually, Facebook and Verizon withdrew their support. The former, after CEO Mark Zuckerberg went to Congress to testify about the Cambridge Analytica scandal.The tech companies claimed that the bill would make it impossible to do business and “innovate on behalf of our customers.” This story originally appeared on Engadget June 29, 2018 3 min read Listen Nowlast_img read more