Entries to Hollis Sponsorship Awards 2012 close this month

first_imgEntries to The Hollis Sponsorship Awards 2012 close on 23 January. The awards, now in their 18th year, are designed to “recognise and reward excellence and effectiveness across all sectors of the sponsorship industry”.Entries can be made by in-house teams, from consultancies and from sponsored organisations/rights-holders.This year the organisers have expanded the number of categories that companies can compete for, reflecting recent developments in the sponsorship business. The media category has been expanded to cover developments across all media including digital. “But we’ve also looked at Arts,” added organisers Rosemary Sarginson. “By adding an Entertainment and Events category we can now cover everything from MTV to Mozart and T in the Park to the Tate Gallery.”The winning entries will be announced at a gala dinner on 27 March 2012 at The London Marriott Grosvenor Square.www.sponsorship-awards.co.uk Entries to Hollis Sponsorship Awards 2012 close this month AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  28 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 18 January 2012 | News Tagged with: Awards corporate sponsorshiplast_img read more

Settling in, stretching out

first_imgHarvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds and University President Drew Faust welcomed the families of first-year undergraduates to campus Friday, and urged them to support students’ exploration of new ideas and identities over the next four years.“There are new choices, new questions” facing freshmen, Hammonds said to freshman parents at Sanders Theatre. “They know enough now to be in a position to ask themselves, ‘Who am I going to be at Harvard?’ And that’s exactly what we want them to be doing.”The event was part of Freshman Parents Weekend, a two-day program of lectures, tours, and open houses held each fall. A record number of attendees — nearly 2,400 parents and guests and more than 1,000 members of the Class of 2015 — registered for this year’s program, thanks in part to the celebration of the 375th anniversary of Harvard’s founding, which took place on Friday night.“Undergraduates arrive at Harvard talented, passionate, and opinionated. If we do our job well, they will leave changed,” said Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds. Students find their identity, Hammonds said, by asking questions that allow them “to stay open to the possibility of transgressing what they see as their own limits, and to embracing surprising new plans.”Hammonds told parents that their children had already begun to settle in at Harvard. She promised that the College would do all it could to help freshmen feel at home on campus, including opening Annenberg Dining Hall during the late afternoon and evening hours to give first-year students a central place to study and meet. At the same time, the College believes that a liberal arts education should help students build a different type of home within themselves.“A colleague of mine at the Law School, the very wise [Dean] Martha Minow, once said that the project of an undergraduate is ‘to build a house of identity and belief,’” she said. “Undergraduates arrive at Harvard talented, passionate, and opinionated. If we do our job well, they will leave changed. … The grounding of their beliefs will be newly solid, and their passions may well have shifted, as a result of building that new house of identity and belief.”Students find their identity, Hammonds said, by asking questions that allow them “to stay open to the possibility of transgressing what they see as their own limits, and to embracing surprising new plans.” This process of discovery is far from rudderless, she said, thanks to the strength of the School’s advising structure, which provides a safety net that allows students to take intelligent risks. Still, Hammonds acknowledged that any exploration worth undertaking can be uncomfortable.“I don’t want to suggest that any of this is easy,” she said. “Certainly some freshmen are feeling the strain of adjustment. … As parents, your job is to love them, and to support them as they lay the bricks for their new homes. Our job here at Harvard is to offer them the widest variety of the best materials, and to encourage them to be brave and inventive architects.”President Drew Faust opened the event and also spoke on the themes of settling in and venturing out. She told parents that she wanted their children to feel a sense of belonging at Harvard, but also to use their time here to strike off in new directions.Faust opened the event and also spoke on the themes of settling in and venturing out. She told parents that she wanted their children to feel a sense of belonging at Harvard, but also to use their time here to strike off in new directions. With a nod to Harvard’s 375th anniversary, Faust, a historian, talked about the way that the study of the past had recently ignited some students’ curiosity and interest.“Just a few weeks ago, students in a freshman seminar on post-traumatic stress disorder in American history visited the University Archives to see just a small fraction of our collection,” she said. “They were especially drawn, I am told, to a diary carried by Harvard President James Conant’s father during the Civil War. Experiences like that one — the chance to feel connected to the past by holding a piece of history in your hand — can and do kindle lifelong passions. And those types of opportunities are ever-present at Harvard.”Nearly 1,000 students and family members learned how to make the most of those opportunities on Saturday, during a presentation by Richard J. Light, Walter H. Gale Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, adjunct faculty at Harvard Kennedy School, and author of “Making the Most of College.” Light advised freshmen to make an effort to get to know well at least one faculty member each year, and pointed to the College’s freshman seminars — which usually cap enrollment at around 14 per class — as ideal for this purpose. Light also counseled students to strike a balance between “investing” — trying a new subject or activity — and “harvesting” — building on strengths they already possess.“I interviewed a student who was a cross-country runner who loved to run, while not being so great at studying modern languages in high school,” he said. “He decided to continue with cross-country running — that is his ‘harvesting’ — while also trying to learn, in a beginning level class, a new foreign language.”Light suggested that students could learn the most in courses where there are many opportunities for them to receive feedback — a class that has weekly short papers, for instance, rather than one that requires only a mid-term and final exam. Lastly, Light told freshmen to reach out to people who disagree with them on ideas and issues that they feel passionate about.“A liberal Democrat might consider making sure a few friends are conservative Republicans, and vice versa,” he said, “not because anyone thinks having such friends will get you to change your mind about everything, but rather because having such friends will push you to clarify why you believe what you believe. Harvard is a once-in-a-lifetime chance for each freshman to get some exposure to new ideas and perspectives from some very smart fellow students.”In between the addresses and presentations, there were opportunities for parents to get their own exposure to undergraduate life. Friday’s activities included tours of Widener Library and Memorial Hall, open houses at many Harvard museums, faculty presentations, and a 375th celebration performance by renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma ’76. On Saturday, some students and families rooted Harvard’s football team to victory against Bucknell, took in the Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club’s production of “Rosenkrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead,” and watched acts from the College’s African-American community compete for a cash scholarship at the Harvard Black Students Association’s Apollo Night.At the John Harvard Statue, Crimson Key tour leader Wendy Chang ’12 (left) offered up some Harvard history to Anita Thewes from Seattle. Thewes is the mother of Hank Smith ’15 (right) and was visiting during Freshman Parents Weekend.Ellen Malka traveled from Virginia to attend the weekend program and to visit with her daughter, Ronit Malka ’15. She appreciated the reassurance offered by the Parents Weekend speakers and said that the message of exploration resonated with her hopes for her daughter.“I think they did a good job of making [parents] feel comfortable,” she said. “I also thought that building a home of identity and belief was a nice concept. It helped me to understand Harvard’s philosophy more and to have a little insight about the process and the end goals. We’ve always felt like exposure to the liberal arts is a really important thing. It’s one of the reasons we’re glad that our daughter’s here.”last_img read more

Busy month ahead for Tipp hurlers

first_imgThe recently appointed boss thinks the work put in January could really stand to players in the National League and the championship.Tipp began their 2016 programme with a victory over Offaly last Sunday and have another game this weekend.Michael believes his players will benefit from the demanding programme set out for them.last_img

Rare Male Calico Kitten Born in West Palm Beach

first_imgAn extremely rare male calico kitten was born in West Palm Beach on Friday.Calico cats are almost always female due to the makeup of genetics in the cat. A rare genetic condition can produce a male.That is what happened at a foster care home here. Photo courtesy: WPEC via Kelly Real“Only 1 in 3000 calicos that are born are male. These cats are so rare that they have often been referred to as the “unicorn” of cats,” says Kelly Real, the cat’s caregiver. “Those who have worked in veterinary practice or in shelters can work for years or even decades without ever seeing one in person.”She adds that what makes the cats so rare is that they typically have a genetic abnormality which gives them three sex chromosomes, XXY, also known as Klinefelter Syndrome in humans.last_img

Boom! Lightning Strikes Washington Monument

first_imgLightning struck the Washington Monument during a thunderstorm in the city Thursday night and it was caught on a Washington, D.C. news station’s sky camera.The stormy weather came as protesters continued to call for an end to police brutality after the death of George Floyd, a black man killed by a white officer in police custody, continued to demonstrate near the White House.Many commenters compared the lightning symbolically to tensions between protesters and the White House.“It might be George Washington raining down brimstone and fire cos’ he’s angry about the state of the union,” one user wrote.last_img

Lacey-based SCJ Alliance adds Eighth Office Location and New Team in…

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by SCJ AllianceWhat started as three people in Thurston County is now more than 90 across the state and into Colorado. Two engineers and a planner have turned their breakaway team into a full-scale, multidisciplinary firm in just 12 years.In July, SCJ Alliance welcomed Studio Cascade, an award-winning, community planning and design firm in Spokane and increased their range even further.“Studio Cascade is highly regarded for their comprehensive plans, subarea plans, and master plans, adding greater depth to our planning group,” SCJ co-founder Jean Carr said.“This is a tremendous opportunity for our firms, our clients, and our employees,” she continued. “We both share a commitment to client relationships and quality work, treasure our employees, and value collaboration across disciplines.”Bill Grimes founded Studio Cascade in 1992. He shares, “Joining our firms provides an opportunity to grow and achieve more together than we could alone. We also have great alignment on our culture and approach to projects, which is so important.”Some of Studio Cascade’s high-visibility projects include the Lacey Depot District Subarea Plan, Council Bluffs Arts and Culture District Plan, Bainbridge Island Waterfront Park and City Dock Master Plan, San Juan County Vision Assessment, and the award-winning Port Angeles Waterfront Transportation Improvement Project.SCJ specializes in environmental and urban planning, civil engineering, transportation planning and design, landscape architecture, and public outreach. The privately-held, majority women-owned firm has been nationally recognized multiple times for growth, award-winning projects, and as a great place to work.In addition to Lacey and Spokane, SCJ has offices in Centralia, Seattle, Ballard, Vancouver, and Wenatchee, Wash. and another in Boulder, Colo.last_img read more