Video: Denver Lax’s Wesley Berg Scored On A Behind-The-Back Shot Through Notre Dame Goalie’s Legs

first_imgDenver's Wesley Berg fakes out goalie before going behind the back.Twitter/@mattrrenzThe opener of the 2015 Men’s Lacrosse Final Four has been pretty ridiculous. Notre Dame made a crazy comeback to tie things up late, but Denver’s Wesley Berg has the day’s unquestioned highlight, a shot that you’re sure to see on SportsCenter later today.Berg catches a ball in the air after a Notre Dame turnover, and shoots it behind the back, through the legs of Notre Dame goalie Shane Doss’ legs.Wesley Berg pic.twitter.com/StDBmzifhI— matt renz (@mattrrenz) May 23, 2015That goal put Denver up 10-6 with just over four minutes remaining, but Notre Dame came all the way back, tying the game with nine seconds left on the clock to send this national semifinal into overtime.last_img

Ole Miss Sells Out Season Tickets In Record Time

first_imgOle Miss Football Tickets are Sold Out.Ole Miss Tickets Sold OutThe Rebels are coming off their first nine-win football season since 2009 and the anticipation for the next chapter is apparent, as Ole Miss has sold out of season tickets in record time, according to Athletic Director Ross Bjork. Was just asked if I wanted to tweet this out first….I jumped at the chance. Thanks to our #OleMiss family! #WAOM pic.twitter.com/Rje3iHISjf— Ross Bjork (@RossBjorkAD) June 23, 2015Earliest (on record) we’ve sold out of @OleMissFB season tickets…….June 23. Expecting new sales record as well! pic.twitter.com/viVYZGn9el— Ross Bjork (@RossBjorkAD) June 23, 2015 After defeating conference opponents like Alabama and Texas A&M during its 7-0 start to the season, it’s easy to see why Ole Miss is excited about the glaring support from its fans.The Rebels didn’t close the 2014-15 season out as strong as they had hoped, losing four of their last six games, but that’s not going to keep the always-proud fan base down. And one can only assume this kind of enthusiasm will pour over into The Grove and then Vaught-Hemingway Stadium come September 5, when the Rebels open up the season at home against UT Martin.last_img read more

Video: Shannon Spake’s Mic Picks Up Arkansas Player Saying “God We Suck” Before Kliff Kingsbury Interview

first_imgA general view of Arkansas' football field.FAYETTEVILLE, AR – SEPTEMBER 2: General view during the game between the University of Southern California Trojans and the Arkansas Razorbacks on September 2, 2006 at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Southern California won 50-14. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)2015 is not going the way that Arkansas envisioned. After ending last season with all kinds of momentum, the Razorbacks have lost two straight games to Toledo and now a struggling Texas Tech team. As ESPN’s Shannon Spake was getting ready to interview the winning coach, Kliff Kingsbury, her mic caught an unidentified Arkansas player saying “god we suck.” It’s not too loud, but with headphones in, it is very clear.“God we suck.” pic.twitter.com/wtx7WdOt4P— Jack Lyall (@jackllyall) September 20, 2015We’re sure plenty of Arkansas fans share the same sentiment after the last few weeks.last_img read more

Government strips local oversight of handling toxic waste water in the North

first_imgEditor’s Note: Aboriginal Affairs responded to this story and their letter to the editor is included below.By Justin LingSpecial to APTN National NewsThe Harper Government’s Northern Action Plan is forging ahead, and the first thing to go is local oversight for a little-known process of dealing with toxic waste water.Until this year, the Northwest Territories local land and water boards were responsible for licensing ‘downhole injections,’ a process through which oil and gas companies get rid of the toxic fluid byproduct of drilling. To do so, the companies drill a well and, through a process similar to fracking itself, pump the liquid at high speeds into underground rock formations.That practice required oversight and public consultations from the land and water boards, who, if satisfied, issue a Type A license.Then, with one fell swoop of the regulatory pen, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development changed the rules. With no debate, and no legislation, licensing decisions regarding downhole injections were now the sole responsibility of the Calgary based National Energy Board. A notice of the change was put out in the Government of Canada publication, the Canada Gazette in November 2012.The reason given was to “include greater efficiency in the regulation of oil and gas activities in the Northwest Territories.”The National Energy board looks primarily at the engineering, environmental and technical side of the projects and doesn’t pretend to evaluate their social license. That, according to one board analyst, is up to the land and water boards and the companies themselves.The change, thanks in no small part to its technical nature, garnered little attention, partially overshadowed by devolution talks between Ottawa and the territory. The Harper Government began working to axe the boards’ regulatory power on downhole injections in 2010 when it announced a broader plan for Northern development, but failed to move forward on most of the announced changes. Now, as the devolution talks near an endpoint, the government seems ready to forge on, and this change is just the first step.According to Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, the department responsible for regulating the land and water board system, the axing of the need to obtain a Type A water license from the land and water boards — was due to double-regulation. They said that the NEB already oversaw the projects; therefore there was no need for the territory to license the process at all.Numerous requests for comment from the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development on the story, but none were returned.It’s good timing for industry. ConocoPhillips is looking to begin a fracking well this winter, and is in the midst of evaluation by both the land and water board and the NEB. The company refused comment on most questions, responding by email that they “respect the regulatory process,” but when asked about holding public consultations, a spokesperson did say that they offered a two-day workshop and a tour of their proposed site for those involved in the regulation process.MGM Energy, a large oil and gas company, had previously lamented the public consultation process for downhole injection at a National Energy Board conference in 2009. MGM then took aim at the territory’s environmental assessment last year after they withdrew plans for a fracking, claiming that the environmental assessment project under the land and water boards was fraught with uncertainty, could take long and could cost too much. They, and many in the territory’s business community, have pushed for the review process’ scope to be tightened.MGM, with other oil and gas companies, have lobbied the federal government extensively on the matter. The scope of the territory’s water and land boards has been the subject of numerous meetings between a half dozen lobbyists and a handful of government MPs since 2008, according to Canada’s lobbying registry.And the product of that lobbying appears to be the Action Plan to Improve Northern Regulatory Regimes, the Harper Government’s game plan for making the North friendlier to development. Changes to the Northwest Territories Waters Regulations, including the local deregulation of downhole injections, were included in that plan.This change very much appears to be step one towards turning the Sahtu into the resource capital of the North. Financial independence for the Northwest Territories, which is plagued with high unemployment in certain regions, would perfectly compliment the territory’s assumption of more powers from the Federal government. Yet Ottawa seems intent on keeping control of the territory’s development review mechanisms.Paul Dixon, Executive Director of the Sahtu Land and Water Board, said that a substantive level of oversight already exists for any waste management system, and that while the process might not be licensed by the board, they will still have the ability to consult the public on the proposed projects.However, when the Federal government informed the other land and water boards of the regulatory change, some feathers were ruffled.“Parties expressed concerns that the removal of the requirement for a Type A water license, and with it the requirement for a public hearing,” reads the summary of the consultation process, published in the Canada Gazette within the notification of the change.Industry has long been “wanting to find a way to grease the skids,” says Kevin O’Reilly, of the environmental think tank Alternatives North. He notes that vesting the power to regulate downhole injections in the NEB is problematic, as the board employs only two staff in the Northwest Territories, and isn’t very present or visible in the area.O’Reilly says that the deregulation might not have much of an impact in the short term, but he says that as more exploration begins, it will be harder to predict the impacts — especially with the fracking process, which is a relatively new and controversial process.Shauna Morgan says that direction is causing worry. “Downhole injection is an issue that community members regularly express concerns about. It is not well understood in communities near the operations.” Morgan, a policy analyst with the Pembina Institute, says that removing any layer of public consultation “will likely breed more distrust and suspicion.”“Projects are losing their social licenses,” says Dennis Bevington, New Democrat MP for Western Arctic. He told this journalist in a phone conversation that axing public consultations isn’t wise when there is “clear public concern” over aspects of development.A big factor on these plans is the disposal of wastewater. Currently, companies either dispose of the water via sump, which has fallen out of fashion after several hazardous leaks, by truck, which proves costly and inefficient, or downhole injection, which has only ever been used on one site in the territory. A 2011 study for the journal of Geothermics studied dozens of fluid injection projects and concluded that, while data is still limited, downhole injections appear to cause low-magnitude earthquakes, while the long-term impacts are still unknown.But the ConocoPhillips plan submitted to the Sahtu Land and Water Board proposes that the company ship the toxic wastewater to Alberta. With the new regulatory changes, the company could, ostensibly, later change course and begin downhole injection and avoid assessment from the Sahtu board. Dixon says he can’t think of a situation where that would happen, saying it’s a “0.1% chance.”As of now, the future of ConocoPhillips’ project is in flux, as the Sahtu Land and Water Board has temporarily waived an environmental assessment, requesting clarification on the company’s plan. They will take time to review the project, and could opt for an environmental review later. The board could further accept or reject the project outright when they come to a decision this summer.But other companies have walked away from the process before, citing the onerous nature of the land and water boards’ review process. The Sahtu board has faced pressure to forgo the environmental review altogether.With Ottawa’s Northern plan finally move forward, that review process stands to become much less onerous. The government plans on merging all the land and water boards together, while a sizeable opposition says the changes will seriously impact the territory’s ability to oversee their own development projects. That fight is just around the corner. Aboriginal Affairs responseDear Editor,I wish to respond to an article which appeared in the May 29 edition of Aboriginal Peoples Television Network National News entitled Government strips local oversight of handling toxic waste water in the North.The resource potential of the North represents a tremendous economic opportunity not just for Northerners but for all Canadians. The federal government’s goals are clear: we want the North’s regulatory regimes to be more effective and predictable, while safeguarding the environmental health and heritage of the region, and providing meaningful Aboriginal consultation. Greater predictability, timelier reviews, reduced regulatory burden and reduced duplication are improvements that will position the North for job creation and long-term economic growth.In his article, the reporter appears to confuse the process of fracking with downhole injection. I want to be clear that these amendments do not permit hydraulic fracturing – a process that is not related to downhole injection.The use of downhole injection wells is considered common practice in Canada for the management of drill wastes and consists of disposing drill waste in conjunction with the drilling of wells for oil and gas exploration or production.Downhole injection is one of several options for the disposal of drill wastes, however prior to these amendments it was the only option subject to duplicate approvals. This amendment aims at streamlining the approval process.Finally, I want to be clear that these regulations were not developed without consultation as your article would suggest. Not only were the proposed changes distributed to Aboriginal organizations, northern boards, environmental organizations and other stakeholders, two rounds of consultations were also conducted between March 2010 and March 2011.As we indicated during those consultations, proposed oil and gas activities will continue to undergo the same rigorous environmental screening and/or assessment processes and there will be no reduction of oversight to ensure environmental risks are identified and appropriate mitigating measures taken.Paula IsaakDirector GeneralNatural Resources and Environment BranchAboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canadalast_img read more

Probe Robert Vadra but also investigate PM Modi Rahul Gandhi

first_imgChennai: Asserting that law must not be applied selectively, Congress president Rahul Gandhi on Wednesday said if his brother-in-law Robert Vadra can be probed so can Prime Minister Narendra Modi for his alleged role in the Rafale deal. He also said economic growth is directly related to the mood of the nation and one cannot expect it to happen in a negative and fearful atmosphere. The Congress will change the mood of the country and make people feel happy and empowered, the Congress chief said while addressing women students at a college here. Also Read – Squadrons which participated in Balakot air strike awarded citations on IAF Day Gandhi, who asked students to refer to him as Rahul, said the law must apply to everybody and not be applied selectively. He said this in response to a question on Vadra, who is being probed in connection with a money laundering case related to purchase of assets abroad and a land case in Rajasthan’s Bikaner district. During his informal interaction with the students, he also brought up the issue of the Rafale deal and reiterated his allegations about the pricing of the aircraft and the process. Also Read – SC declines Oil Min request to stay sharing of documents on Reliance penalty “I will be the first person to say it… Investigate Robert Vadra but also investigate Prime Minister Narendra Modi,” he said. Modi is a “corrupt” man, he bypassed negotiations and ran parallel negotiations on the Rafale deal, Gandhi alleged while responding to the question. The Congress chief said the prime minister should have the guts to face the media and asked why Modi was “hiding”. The BJP and the government have repeatedly rejected the Congress’s allegation of corruption in the Rafale fighter jet deal. He also alleged that the BJP’s idea is to capture every institution of the country and run them from Nagpur, the RSS headquarters. Gandhi said the Congress would pass the women’s reservation bill if it comes to power. “Don’t see enough women in leadership positions. You cannot have women in power in India until the attitude towards them changes,” he told the cheering crowd. In response to a question, he said he had learnt the lessons of humility and love from his mother Sonia Gandhi. He asked the gathering, “Did you like demonetisation?” When the audience answered, “No”, he said, “I think it’s pretty clear the damage demonetisation did. PM should have taken your advice.” Gandhi, who asked the students to challenge him and “make him uncomfortable”, also questioned whether the prime minister could stand in a large audience and answer people’s questions. Referring to Modi’s policies on Jammu and Kashmir, he said these were setting fire to the state and blamed the Centre for not strategically and systematically handling terrorism. As soon as Modi assumed power, he made a “huge mistake” of forging an alliance with PDP just for the sake of power. “Today Narendra Modi ji’s policies are actually setting fire to Kashmir,” he said, alleging that it was his policies that were allowing Pakistan to carry out terrorist acts in India. Gandhi underscored the need to engage the people of Kashmir and bring them “on our side.” The prime minister’s policies “pushes the people away so you cannot fight terrorism with one off gestures,” he said. Noting that it was “our responsibility” to stop the neighbouring country from carrying out terror strikes and save our people, Gandhi said, “It is not good enough to say that 45 CRPF men died and now we will do something.” He sought to know why the attack (in Pulwama) was not stopped in the first place. Forty CRPF personnel were killed and five injured on February 14 in one of the deadliest terror attacks in Jammu and Kashmir when a Jaish-e-Mohammad suicide bomber rammed a vehicle carrying explosives into their bus in Pulwama district. Claiming that the Congress pursued a policy of systematic and strategic approach in Jammu and Kashmir, he said the NDA government had not followed a similar policy. “We actually crushed terrorism,” he said and referred to the “drastic fall” in the number of soldiers and people killed during UPA’s tenure. The Congress followed a multi-pronged approach when it came to power in 2004 and toed both systematic and strategic lines, he said. “And it was successful,” he said adding it led to diplomatic isolation of Pakistan. Gandhi also called his party’s minimum income guarantee scheme a revolutionary idea.last_img read more

Rahman creates India anthem for Endgame

first_imgMumbai: Music maestro A R Rahman has teamed up with Marvel India to create an all-new anthem for Avengers: Endgame in Hindi, Tamil and Telugu. The track, to be released on April 1, is a treat for Indian fans of the Avengers franchise, which is massively popular in the country. “Being surrounded by Marvel fans in my own family, there was too much pressure to come with something really satisfying and apt for ‘Avengers: Endgame’. I hope Marvel aficionados and music lovers enjoy the track,” Rahman said in a statement. Also Read – I have personal ambitions now: Priyanka”Avengers: Endgame is not just a movie, it’s an emotional journey for fans everywhere in India. An original composition by Oscar winner A R Rahman was the perfect way to celebrate the love for Marvel among fans in the country. This is our small way of thanking the fans here for their extraordinary support,” said Bikram Duggal, Head – Studios, Marvel India. The film is produced by Kevin Feige and directed by Anthony and Joe Russo.last_img read more

Will stick to fiscal prudence lower tax rates if elected Jaitley

first_imgNew Delhi: Finance Minister Arun Jaitley Thursday said the BJP-led NDA will continue with fiscal prudence and lower tax rates if elected back to power. He further said the GST (Goods and Services Tax) Council has cut tax rates on consumption items to 12 or 18 per cent from the highest slab of 28 per cent and lowering rate on cement is next on agenda. “I speak in terms of taxation policies… I’m quite clear in my mind that on two issues at least we had – a lot of good fiscal prudence and we brought the rates down, these are two areas, if we are in power we will continue the same glide path,” Jaitley said while addressing the CII AGM here. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalThe general elections will be held in phases beginning April 11 and counting of votes will take place on May 23. Jaitley said India’s growth has stabilised between 7-7.5 per cent and irrespective of global trends, domestic consumption is going to increase. “We have come to 7-7.5 per cent (growth rate) range despite the fact that there is no global boom or support of any kind, and we have stabilised at that, you need to graduate further,” he added. The Reserve Bank of India Thursday cut its GDP growth forecast for the current fiscal by 20 basis points (bps) to 7.2 per cent. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostThe minister said that over the last 5 years the government did not increase tax rates, and in some cases doubled tax base and increased tax collection. “In the last 20 odd months of the GST except for Cement that is because of affordability, … every item of consumption has come down to 18 per cent and 12 per cent category from 28 per cent. So, it is only a matter of time that the last one also comes down,” Jaitley said. Asked what steps would be taken if the government comes to power, Jaitley said, “Wait for a couple of days, when our manifesto comes out, you may find some of the views expressed in that”. The government had revised upwards the fiscal deficit target for 2018-19 fiscal to 3.4 per cent from 3.3 per cent projected in the budget. For current fiscal, which begun on April 1, the fiscal deficit target has been set at 3.4 per cent.last_img read more

Basketballs Other 3Point Revolution

The Steph Curry Pull-Up Vigil has been going on for weeks now.Curry is the pagan god of long-range pull-ups, a shot that doesn’t seem to have a place in a league obsessed with efficiency. But over the last three seasons, Curry has made it work anyway, leading the league in pull-up threes — taken and made — and hitting them about 40 percent of the time. But this season he got off to a slow start, making 21.4 percent of his pull-up threes in December, and today he’s sitting at 33.3 percent, just a hair below Russell Westbrook’s mark. Curry’s swoon is hard to explain, but he’s shooting 43.3 percent in his last 10 games and 48.5 in his last five. Smart money says he’ll be just fine.Glance at that pull-up leaderboard, though, and you’ll notice that Curry’s seat hasn’t been vacated, it’s been overtaken. Where just a few years ago Curry was the unrivaled king of pumping efficient points out of a traditionally inefficient well, today an armful of players are doing convincing Steph impersonations off the bounce.The logic against the pull-up three is simple: It’s far, far easier to shoot a spot-up jumper than it is to shoot off the dribble, and it’s far, far easier to find an open look by moving without the ball than it is while holding the ball. This is why most modern offenses are built to work the ball around to players in motion off the ball, looking for an open catch-and-shoot three, preferably from the corner. If the goal of an offense is to seek the most efficient shots, and the best offenses are chasing spot-up threes, then the alternative is clearly less than ideal.The argument in favor of the shot is somehow even simpler: If it goes in, it’s unstoppable. For a player with a certain set of skills, it’s a shot that’s both always available and always open.For the last three seasons, Curry has been unstoppable. For all the intricacies and nuance built into the Warriors’ offense, the single most unguardable piece of it was always Curry pulling up from 30 feet or sliding around a ball screen and flicking up a jumper. Fans, announcers and coaches all learned to recite the Steph Curry mantra: That’s a bad shot if anyone else takes it. Except, increasingly, it isn’t.This season, 26 players are taking at least two pull-up threes per game, up from 17 in 2013-14 and 21 last season. Of the guys taking at least two per game this season, 12 are hitting at least 36 percent (the league average for all threes), up from five in ’13-14. Kemba Walker is taking 4.5 per game and hitting 37.3 percent; Kyle Lowry is taking 4.1 per game and hitting 41.5; James Harden is making less than 32 percent of his, but he’s taking 6.4 a game, tied for the most in the four years the NBA has kept track of pull-ups. We can’t write off this wave of Steph-like gunners who have emerged as mere early-season noise this deep into the schedule. These players aren’t just taking Curry’s signature shots — they’re making a good number of them as well. And that says something about the way teams are approaching modern offense.Not many players can approximate the totality of Steph Curry, but they can emulate him piecemeal. The Rockets, for instance, are shooting from the parking lot this year, distorting the basic shapes of NBA defenses. And while not many teams can duplicate the ball movement of Houston or Cleveland — movement that sets up all those open threes — a good number of them have a guy who can shake his man and rise up for a three. In a league dominated by the long ball, teams seem to be coming around to the idea that sometimes one player can make his own shot, especially if the guy can hit it regularly.The shift in the league’s approach is noticeable at the team level as much as at the player level. In 2013-14, teams averaged 5.1 pull-up threes per game; by last season, that had climbed to 5.9 per game, and this season we’re up at 6.6. A shot and a half per game doesn’t sound like a lot, but that represents an increase of about 30 percent. For context, compare that to what’s happened during the league’s “scoring explosion” — that has come with just a 25 percent rise in overall 3-point attempts over the same four seasons. As teams try to cram ever more threes into each game, a little revolution within the revolution is changing the ways that these shots are created. Hero ball is allowed back on the court, so long as it’s at the 3-point line.This spike in pull-ups isn’t just about the NBA’s faster, rip-and-run style of play these days. When I looked at numbers for the traditional image of a pull-up three — a point guard dribbling the leather off of the ball 30 feet from the rim for ages, only to pull up from deep without ever sniffing the paint — I still saw an uptick in volume and performance. Eleven players are taking at least one three per game on plays where they took seven or more dribbles before the shot (that’s the proxy we’re using for half-court, rather than transition, shots). Six of them are shooting at least 40 percent. Back in 2013-14, those numbers were seven and three.Because the NBA only has reliable data on pull-ups for a few seasons, it’s tough to say how much of this comes down to luck from year to year, like a player’s BABIP in baseball. Walker went from shooting 31.9, 25.6, and 32.2 percent on pull-up threes in years past to 37.3 so far this season; Lowry was a mid-30s guy until this season, when he’s jumped up to 41.5 percent; Kyrie Irving has consistently been in the high 30s to low 40s, except last season, when he slumped badly to 29.1. The individual players peaking from season to season can and likely will shift around. But even with a revolving-door cast, the trend can live on. If it does, it might just give the 3-point revolution a little more flavor.Whether it’s the razzle-dazzle of Curry’s Shammgod or Kemba’s UTEP two-step, or Westbrook hitting the handbrake and going from top speed to perfectly perpendicular in one bounce, or LeBron and Harden casually walking into an unblockable shot, the pull-up done right is a beautiful thing. And if its most proficient practitioners have reached a point where we can reclaim it from the analytics-say-it’s-bad graveyard, perhaps NBA fans won’t be so quick to mourn the next time Steph Curry has a bad December. read more

Walkon receiver hopes to remain involved in sports after OSU career

Ricky Crawford, from Lewis Center, Ohio, followed his dream and joined the Ohio State football team as a walk-on wide receiver during spring drills in 2008. “To come to Ohio State has been my dream since I can remember,” Crawford said. “I never wanted to go to a different school.” Despite only being on scout team, Crawford worked hard helping OSU prepare for upcoming opponents. In his first two seasons at OSU, Crawford received the scout team workhorse award five times. It should also be noted that Crawford has never missed a practice. Going into his senior year in 2010, Crawford changed his position to tight end adding a little bulk to his 6-foot-3-inch, 215-pound frame. “I had to work hard to gain the weight,” Crawford said. “I’m helping with being a receiver/tight end, just going out there doing whatever I can do to help the team.” Crawford’s hard work, dedication and willingness to help the team have finally paid off. He was awarded a scholarship this season and has earned playing time in five games. “It’s a little different. I really haven’t noticed it too much other than the fact that I can stay after practice and eat,” Crawford said. After the season is over, Crawford said he wants to work out for the OSU pro day. However, if professional football falls through for Crawford, he has a backup plan. “I want to go back to school and get a degree in education and maybe coach high school football,” Crawford said. “I just know I want to stay close to sports.” read more

Still no word on new Ohio State football coaches pay

(Left) Former Penn State defensive line coach Larry Johnson is reported to be coming to OSU as a defensive coach. Courtesy of The Daily CollegiateArkansas defensive coordinator Chris Ash is reported to be coming to OSU as a defensive coach. Courtesy of Arkansas Athletic Department It has been a week since Ohio State formally announced a new addition to football coach Urban Meyer’s coaching staff, and another is imminent, according to multiple reports, social media accounts and the school’s own directory.OSU officially named assistant head coach and defensive line coach Larry Johnson to Meyer’s staff Jan. 15. But the other new staff member, co-defensive coordinator and defensive backs coach Chris Ash, has yet to be announced by the school as a coach.Aside from when Ash will officially join Johnson as a member of the Buckeyes coaching staff is how much each new coach will be paid.An OSU spokesman told The Lantern in a series of emails Tuesday that the Buckeyes have “only announced Larry Johnson as a member of the coaching staff.”The spokesman also said the Department of Human Resources has yet to inform him of Johnson’s salary following multiple email requests by The Lantern beginning Jan. 15.The Lantern has been requesting information on both of the new coaches’ salaries since Johnson was announced by the school as a coach last week. The Lantern staff requests for the salaries of new OSU employees after their hiring and is typically provided the information within 24 to 48 hours of submitting the request.Though he has not yet officially been named an OSU coach, Ash has since changed the bio for his personal Twitter account, @CoachChrisAsh, to reflect his reported new position.“Co-Defensive Coordinator/Defensive Backs Coach for The Ohio State University,” the bio reads, also including a URL address to the football page on the OSU athletic website, where he has yet to be listed.Ash is also listed on OSU’s public directory Find People as “Assistant Coach – Major Sports.” Ash’s working title is listed as “Assistant Coach – Football” in the directory.Johnson, who is set to replace former OSU defensive line coach Mike Vrabel after Vrabel announced his intentions to join the NFL’s Houston Texans via Twitter Jan. 9, is known for his ability to recruit and mentor defensive linemen who eventually make the jump to the NFL. Meyer called Johnson an “outstanding addition” to the Buckeye coaching staff and said he has “great respect for (Johnson) as a family man, as a coach and mentor of young men and as a recruiter,” according to an OSU press release.It appears Johnson has already been hot on the recruiting trail since being announced as a coach at OSU. According to his personal Twitter account, @OSUrushmen1, Johnson’s first day working for the Buckeyes was Jan. 16.“Great first day as a buckeye on the road ! Osurushmen1,” a tweet from the account read. Johnson, along with Meyer, was also in a photo posted to the social media site by OSU defensive line commit Dylan Thompson, @BRONCODE59, posted Monday evening.According to the USA TODAY coaches database, Ash made a base salary of $550,000 this past season at Arkansas, including a “max bonus” of $45,833. Johnson’s salary while he was at Penn State was not available on the database, and the school did not respond to multiple requests by The Lantern for the figure.In his second and final year at OSU, Ash’s predecessor, Everett Withers — who was announced as the new head football coach at James Madison University Dec. 20 — earned $585,000. Vrabel made $291,004.Both coaches look to strengthen a defensive unit that has gone south since Meyer took over following the 2011 season, a year where the Buckeyes finished with the nation’s 19th best defense. The unit finished 34th in 2012 and 47th overall this past year.OSU is set to kick off the 2014-15 season Aug. 30 against Navy at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. read more