RSF joins statement reiterating calls for US government to insist on accountability for Khashoggi murder

first_imgNonetheless, the Trump administration has persisted in actions that can only be described as covering for the crimes of Saudi authorities. On October 10, 2018, a bipartisan group of 22 Senators, including the then-chairman and ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee (SFRC), triggered Section 1263(d) of the Global Magnitsky Act, which directed the President to report, by February 8, 2019, to that committee on those individuals—including the crown prince—that the U.S. government believes had a role in Mr. Khashoggi’s murder. We applaud Chairman Engel’s decision, in his role at the time as House Foreign Affairs Committee (HFAC) ranking member, to reinforce this determination requirement via a letter dated October 12, 2018, co-signed with then-HFAC Chairman Ed Royce. WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists We, the undersigned organizations dedicated to the promotion and protection of universal human rights, write to commend you for your statements concerning the murder of Saudi journalist, Washington Post columnist, and Virginia resident Jamal Khashoggi, and to request that you continue to pursue accountability for this abhorrent crime as part of a larger re-assessment of the U.S.-Saudi relationship. On February 8, a senior administration official announced that President Trump refused to comply with the congressional mandate required by both the HFAC and SFRC. On the same day, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo issued a letter declining to address the determination requirement or offering any additional information concerning Mr. Khashoggi’s murder. These actions followed a written statement issued by President Trump in November 2018 in which the president pointedly equated Mohammed bin Salman’s denial of involvement in Mr. Khashoggi’s killing with the considered views of the U.S. intelligence community. Specifically, we urge that you demand that the Trump administration provide appropriate members of Congress with the determination of responsibility for Mr. Khashoggi’s murder required under Section 1263(d) of the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act of 2016, as well as relevant information documenting how the administration came to its determination. Given the administration’s demonstrated unwillingness to provide members of Congress with the determination required by the Global Magnitsky Act, or to supply information relevant to its decision-making in this matter, we further recommend that you consider holding hearings and/or issuing subpoenas to compel this information, in keeping with Congress’ constitutional oversight role. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) sent a joint letter on March 14 with 10 other press freedom and human rights organizations to the ranking members of the House of Representatives’ Foreign Affairs Committee, asking them to ensure to continue to pursue accountability for the murder of Jamal Khashoggi. March 14, 2019 Follow the news on Americas Related documents 19.03.14_jk-hfac-letter.pdfPDF – 283.79 KB Further, the administration’s refusal to respect Congress’ constitutionally-mandated role in overseeing foreign policy threatens both U.S. democracy and national security. One branch of government trying to obscure the truth from another on an issue of this magnitude subverts the will of American voters who elect members of Congress to be partners with—not subordinate to—the executive in the conduct of foreign policy. The administration’s position also sows doubt among America’s allies concerning its resolve to uphold universal human rights, while emboldening human rights violators like Iran eager to point to perceived hypocrisy. June 7, 2021 Find out more As you know, on October 2, 2018, a team of Saudi Arabian hit men are credibly alleged to have murdered Mr. Khashoggi after luring him into Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul, Turkey. On December 4, 2018, following a classified briefing by CIA Director Gina Haspel, multiple Senators indicated publicly that the CIA’s findings constituted overwhelming evidence of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s (MBS) central role in Khashoggi’s murder, and on December 13, 2018, the Senate unanimously passed a non-binding resolution finding MBS “complicit” in Khashoggi’s murder on the basis of “evidence and analysis made available to this institution.” Separately, the United Nations’ Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions stated, in early February 2019, that evidence collected during her trip to Turkey “demonstrates a prime facie case that Mr. Khashoggi was the victim of a brutal and premeditated killing, planned and perpetrated by officials of the State of Saudi Arabia.” to go further Mr. Khashoggi’s premeditated killing violated many acceptable norms of human and state behavior. The murder’s authors clearly intended their crime to send a chilling message to Saudis at home and abroad: that those who peacefully criticize the government’s autocratic rule will never be safe, no matter where they flee. Saudi leaders apparently acted under the belief that they could issue this message without repercussion. For Mr. Khashoggi’s sake, and for the sake of human rights defenders the world over, Congress cannot allow this misguided belief to stand. Because the Trump administration will not defend the rights of the persecuted to speak without fear of assassination, Congress must. United StatesSaudi ArabiaAmericasMiddle East – North Africa International bodies News June 3, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information Yasin AKGUL / AFP RSF_en United StatesSaudi ArabiaAmericasMiddle East – North Africa International bodies Reports President Trump’s refusal to comply with the Global Magnitsky Act has rightfully garnered criticism from Democratic and Republican members of Congress in both the House and Senate. Among other reactions, we welcome Ranking Member McCaul’s statement of February 9, in which he said that he was: In defending its refusal to comply with extant law and/or provide information related to Mr. Khashoggi’s murder, the administration has claimed that it is acting consistent with the constitutional separation of powers. Yet, as a trio of former U.S. Justice Department attorneys recently wrote, a president cannot elect to simply decline to accommodate congressional oversight. While legal scholars may differ on the administration’s constitutional obligations under the Global Magnitsky Act’s Section 1263(d), the point remains that in rejecting appropriate congressional oversight in the Khashoggi case, the Trump administration is itself threatening the separation of powers and contesting the role of congressional mandates more broadly. Allowing the administration to simply sweep this matter under the rug, as Saudi officials would prefer, therefore poses a challenge not only to the administration of justice, but to fundamental congressional prerogatives. News “[D]eeply troubled by the letter I received from the Administration regarding the brutal murder of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. The letter does not meet the requirements of the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act… Everyone involved in this gruesome crime must be identified and held accountable. When the United States fails to lead, we compromise our integrity and abandon those pursuing justice around the world.” We respectfully thank you for your consideration of this important matter. News Dear Chairman Engel and Ranking Member McCaul, Organisation 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Receive email alerts March 14, 2019 RSF joins statement reiterating calls for US government to insist on accountability for Khashoggi murder Signed, Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says Americans for Democracy & Human Rights in BahrainCommittee to Protect JournalistsFreedom HouseHuman Rights FirstHuman Rights WatchJacob Blaustein Institute for the Advancement of Human RightsOpen Society Justice InitiativePEN AmericaProject on Middle East DemocracyReporters Without BordersRobert F. Kennedy Human Rights May 13, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

ECISD test scores show growth; district still trails state

first_img Local NewsEducation ECISD test scores show growth; district still trails state ECISD, STAAR logos Ector County Independent School District released scores for the 2018 administration of the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness tests Tuesday and said they show growth in many areas.The district has eight campuses on improvement required status under state accountability regulations. Ector Middle School, Noel and Zavala elementary are in their fifth year. If the campuses don’t come off the list, they will face closure or the Texas Education Commissioner will appoint a board of managers over the whole district.“Of the eight schools that are on the improvement required list, we are hopeful that the majority of them can come off the list based on their preliminary data in student growth. We are very hopeful our schools are going to make it. For most of them, it is down to a few kids that determine if they meet standard or not. A few variables must still be taken into account. For example, students who moved to or from another school or district are included in the results. By August, all of the data released will be final with all variables including removing the results from the disputed online testing that occurred in the spring,” Superintendent Tom Crowe said in a news release.The state results give students a STAAR performance level of masters grade level, meets grade level, approaches grade level or did not meet grade level. Performance labels of masters, meets or approaches indicate the students passed the test.The release said the labels are meant to provide clear, accurate information for parents on how their child is performing, in terms of meeting grade level, the release said. ECISD scores show improvement, but still trail state results.At the elementary level, ECISD saw gains across all grade levels and all tested subjects when comparing year to year performance, the release said. At the middle school and high school level, ECISD also gained in six of the tested grade levels and subject areas.In math, Ector and Bonham middle schools, Austin Montessori, Blackshear, Blanton, Buice, Burleson, Downing, Goliad, Gonzales, Jordan, LBJ, Milam, Murry Fly, Noel, Pease, San Jacinto, Travis, Buddy West and Zavala elementary schools showed double-digit gains in one grade level or more.In reading/English language arts, Falcon Early College High School, Austin, Blanton, Cameron, Downing, Buddy West, Goliad, Ireland, LBJ, Jordan, Milam, Murry Fly, Noel, Pease, Ross, San Jacinto, Sam Houston and Travis had double-digit gains in one or more grade levels.Goliad, Jordan, Murry Fly, Noel, Buddy West, Zavala and Ector County Youth Center all posted double-digit gains in science.WRITINGFifty-one percent of ECISD students tested in writing in spring 2018 approached grade level or higher; 27 percent met grade level or higher; and 5 percent were at masters grade level or higher.Of the seventh-graders tested in ECISD, 48 percent approached grade level or higher in writing; 23 percent met grade level; and 5 percent mastered grade level or higher, the release said.Statewide, 61 percent approached grade level; 38 percent met grade level; and 10 percent mastered grade level.Sixty-seven percent of seventh-graders approached grade level; 41 percent met grade level; and 14 percent mastered grade level.SCIENCEIn science, 66 percent of fifth-graders in ECISD approached grade level or higher; 27 percent met grade level or higher; and 9 percent mastered grade level or higher.Among ECISD eighth-graders, 60 percent approached grade level or higher in science; 32 percent met grade level or higher; and 12 percent mastered grade level or higher, the release said.Statewide in science, 75 percent of fifth-graders approached grade level or higher; 40 percent met grade level or higher; and 16 percent mastered grade level or higher.For eighth-graders statewide, 74 percent approached grade level; 50 percent met grade level; and 27 percent mastered grade level.SOCIAL STUDIESIn social studies, 35 percent of ECISD eighth-graders approached grade level; 9 percent met grade level; and 3 percent mastered grade level.Statewide, 64 percent of eighth-graders approached grade level; 34 percent met grade level; and 20 percent mastered grade level.MATHIn math, ECISD 67 percent of ECISD third-graders approached grade level or higher; 35 percent met grade level or higher; and 15 percent mastered grade level or higher.Statewide, 77 percent of third-graders approached grade level; 46 percent met grade level; and 23 percent mastered grade level.In ECISD, 68 percent of fourth-graders taking the math test approached grade level; 36 percent met grade level; and 16 percent mastered grade level.Statewide in math, 78 percent of fourth-graders approached grade level; 47 percent met grade level; and 26 percent mastered grade level.In fifth-grade math in ECISD, 74 percent approached grade level; 41 percent met grade level; and 17 percent mastered grade level.Statewide, 84 percent of fifth-graders taking the math test approached grade level; 57 percent met grade level; and 30 percent mastered grade level.Sixty-percent of ECISD sixth-graders approached grade level in math; 23 percent met grade level; and 6 percent mastered grade level.Statewide, 76 percent of sixth-graders approached grade level in math; 43 percent met grade level; and 17 percent mastered grade level.In ECISD, 52 percent of seventh-graders approached grade level in math; 20 percent met grade level; and 7 percent mastered grade level.Statewide, 71 percent of seventh-graders approached grade level in math; 38 percent met grade level; and 17 percent mastered grade level.Fifty-percent of ECISD eighth-graders approached grade level in math; 16 percent met grade level; and 2 percent mastered grade level.Statewide, 78 percent of eighth-graders approached grade level in math; 49 percent met grade level; and 15 percent mastered grade level.READINGIn reading in ECISD, 68 percent of third-graders approached grade level; 30 percent met grade level; and 16 percent mastered grade level.Statewide in reading, 76 percent of third-graders approached grade level; 42 percent met grade level; and 24 percent mastered grade level.In ECISD, 60 percent of fourth-graders approached grade level in reading; 33 percent met grade level; and 16 percent mastered grade level.Statewide, 72 percent of fourth-graders approached grade level in reading; 45 percent met grade level; and 24 percent mastered grade level.Sixty-three percent of fifth-graders in ECISD approached grade level in reading; 36 percent met grade level; and 13 percent mastered grade level.Statewide, 78 percent of fifth-graders approached grade level in reading; 51 percent met grade level; and 25 percent mastered grade level.In ECISD, 46 percent of sixth-graders approached grade level in reading; 19 percent met grade level; and 7 percent mastered grade level.Statewide in reading, 66 percent of sixth-graders approached grade level; 36 percent met grade level; and 18 percent mastered grade level.ECISD had 52 percent of seventh-graders approaching grade level in reading; 25 percent met grade level; and 12 percent mastered grade level.Statewide, 72 percent of seventh-graders approached grade level in reading; 45 percent met grade level; and 27 percent mastered grade level.Fifty-nine percent of eighth-graders in ECISD approached grade level in reading; 26 percent met grade level; and 11 percent mastered grade level.Statewide, 76 percent of eighth-graders approached grade level in reading; 46 percent met grade level; and 25 percent mastered grade level.END-OF-COURSE EXAMSIn end-of-course exams, 69 percent of ECISD students approached grade level in algebra I; 30 percent met grade level; and 11 percent mastered grade level.Statewide, 83 percent of students tested approached grade level; 56 percent met grade level; and 33 percent mastered grade level.In English 1, 47 percent of ECISD students tested approached grade level; 30 percent met grade level; and 3 percent mastered grade level.In English I statewide, 60 percent approached grade level; 44 percent met grade level; and 7 percent mastered grade level.In English II at ECISD, 57 percent approached grade level; 38 percent met grade level; and 3 percent mastered grade level.Statewide in English II, 66 percent approached grade level; 50 percent met grade level; and 8 percent mastered grade level.In biology, 83 percent of ECISD students tested approached grade level; 48 percent met grade level; and 12 percent mastered grade level.Statewide, 87 percent of students approached grade level in biology; 60 percent met grade level; and 24 percent mastered grade level.In U.S. history at ECISD, 88 percent of students tested approached grade level; 60 percent met grade level; and 29 percent mastered grade level.Statewide in U.S. history, 92 percent approached grade level; 72 percent met grade level; and 42 percent mastered grade level. Pinterest OCA top 2 were ESL students Twitter Southern Style Potato SaladTexas Fried ChickenVirgin Coco MojitoPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay Home Local News Education ECISD test scores show growth; district still trails state Noel earns award Facebookcenter_img Previous articleOdessa man killed in train collision early TuesdayNext articleDAILY OIL PRICE: June 19 admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By admin – June 19, 2018 WhatsApp Pinterest Registration set for engineering camp Twitter WhatsApp Facebooklast_img read more

The Latest: Minnesota officials urge proper mask wearing

first_img TAGS  By Digital AIM Web Support – February 13, 2021 Facebook Local NewsBusinessUS News Twitter Twitter The Latest: Minnesota officials urge proper mask wearing Pinterest WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleCunningham’s 15 lead No. 23 Oklahoma St. past Kansas St.Next articleGirard leads balanced Syracuse past Boston College 75-67 Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

Second Covid Wave: Calcutta High Court To Function Completely Through Virtual Mode Till Further Orders

first_imgNews UpdatesSecond Covid Wave: Calcutta High Court To Function Completely Through Virtual Mode Till Further Orders Nupur Thapliyal13 April 2021 8:47 PMShare This – xIn view of the recent surge in the Covid-19 cases, the Calcutta High Court on Tuesday, on the recommendation of its Covid Committee, decided to hold hearings only through virtual mode from 14 April 2021 till further orders at principal seat at Kolkata and circuit benches at Jalpaiguri and Port Blair.The notification modifies the earlier notification dated 8th April 2021 wherein a decision…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginIn view of the recent surge in the Covid-19 cases, the Calcutta High Court on Tuesday, on the recommendation of its Covid Committee, decided to hold hearings only through virtual mode from 14 April 2021 till further orders at principal seat at Kolkata and circuit benches at Jalpaiguri and Port Blair.The notification modifies the earlier notification dated 8th April 2021 wherein a decision was taken to hold hearings via hybrid mode including both physical and virtual mode of hearings till April 30.As per the modified notification, the new resolution with regards to the functioning of the Court reads as under:”All Court proceedings shall be in the virtual mode only. It shall be the option of the Hon’ble Judge concerned if Court proceedings are to be done from the Court or from His Lordship’s chamber. Court timings shall be from 10.30 A.M to 01.15 P.M and from 02.00 to 03.00 P.M.”The notification also states that the Registrar General/Registrar (Original Side) shall regulate the staff attendance by rotation so that there is not more than 60% attendance on any day. Moreover, the Registrar is also directed to ensure that the entire staff is assigned duties on rotational basis.The Government is also requested to complete the vaccination drive of the employees of the Hon’ble Court at the earliest. Further directions read as under:- All new filings should be accompanied by a brief list of dates, synopsis of the case with a copy of the impugned decision or action, not exceeding 2 pages. The PP and APPs shall furnish synopsis of the case diary to the ACO through the PP office for placing before the Court. In case the Bench concerned requires physical production of case diary, the PP may be directed to do the needful. – All other notifications in force not contrary to the above shall remain in force. – All the District Judges in the State shall regulate functioning of the Courts on virtual or hybrid mode, regulating the attendance of the staff and the presence of the learned lawyers in such a way so as to take all precautions on account of increase in Covid cases. Matter for vaccination of the staff shall also be taken up with the local administration on priority basis.Click Here To Read NotificationNext Storylast_img read more

Southern Classic Food Group bringing new processor to Brundidge

first_img Messenger photo/Jaine TreadwellThe announcement Monday of the formation of a new industry, a pickle plant, in Brundidge received a toast from business owners, Lamar Steed, left, Chip Wallace and center Pike County Commissioner Joey Jackson.Southern Classic Food Group, the City of Brundidge and the Pike County Economic Development Corporation announced Monday the formation of a new company, Magnolia Vegetable Processors, which is in partnership with Southern Classic Foods, Southern Picklers and others.Magnolia Vegetable Processors will process a variety of dill products including cucumbers, peppers, okra and relishes. The company will also produce salsas, which will include diced tomato based products with a variety of flavors and package sizes. The new company will be located on property adjacent to Southern Classic Food Group in the Brundidge’s North Industrial Park,The company’s brine products will be brought in for packaging initially but produce will also be purchased locally and from other southern markets for processing at the Brundidge facility. Next UpThe initial investment in the new food processing company is estimated at $5.56 million. Twenty-two jobs will be created the first year with a total of 55-60 jobs being created within 30 months. Plans are to have products on line by May 2016.The announcement of the new company was made at a gathering of city and county elected officials and business and community leaders Monday afternoon at the Southern Classic Food Group site.At the same time, Chuck Caraway, owner and president of Southern Classic Foods Group, announced the expansion of his company’s facility with a $3.2 million new investment. Southern Classic Foods will partner with a significant nationally distributed juice company to package food service orange, lemon and lime juice products under a multi-year contract agreement. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Email the author Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Messenger photo/Jaine TreadwellGreg Canfield, secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, left, Jimmy Ramage, Brundidge mayor, center, and Chuck Caraway, right, owner and president Southern Classic Food Group, announced Monday the formation of Magnolia Vegetable Processors, a pickling plant in Brundidge, and the expansion of Southern Classic Foods to include a juice division. Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Published 4:00 am Tuesday, June 9, 2015 Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Book Nook to reopen By Jaine Treadwell Southern Classic Food Group bringing new processor to Brundidge Brundidge Mayor Jimmy Ramage said the announcements of the new food processing company and the expansion of an existing company represent $8.7 million in new investments in Brundidge.“With these investments, 75-80 jobs will be created,” Ramage said. “Both projects expect to be operational during the first quarter of 2016.”Ramage gave credit to landmark decisions made by former Brundidge city officials for paving the way for the industrial growth of Brundidge over the years.“Their decisions to have ownership in our utilities and the gas company and to install a waste water treatment facility that could handle industrial waste from food processing plants made days like today possible,” he said. “You can’t put a price on that.” Ramage also said the city has recently received its first ad valorem tax check from the Wal-Mart DC.“That money, about $80,000, made it possible for the city to purchase 222 acres for future industrial growth in this industrial park,” Ramage said. “The City of Brundidge is ready for future industrial growth.”Caraway, who has 18 years experience in the food processing industry, was working with a food processing company in Brundidge prior to starting his own business in 2001.But he needed to look no further than Brundidge for a place to locate.Brundidge’s long history in the mayonnaise and salad dressing business provided him with a community of potential employees who knew the business.He started Southern Classic Food Group in a former Piggly Wiggly building that was too small to house the business so he farmed it out all around town. Today, Southern Classic Foods is a 205,000-square-foot facility with plans to expand another 28,000-square-feet.Ramage said visionaries such as Caraway continue to find and create ways to provide products and employment that keep small communities alive and vibrant.“We have more people that come to work in Brundidge every day than put their heads down here at night,” he said. “We have job opportunities for people in our town and in the surrounding area. Southern Classic Foods and Magnolia Vegetable Processors are in the process of bringing more jobs to Brundidge and we cannot thank them enough.”Greg Canfield, secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce, represented the governor’s office Monday afternoon. He said industrial growth doesn’t happen easily or alone. It takes many people working together to make industrial growth happen.“It takes strong partners like Power South and Southeast Alabama Gas to build a case for industrial growth,” he said. “I see a continuation of great things happening here through organic growth.”As existing industries expand by increased output, customer base expansion, new product development and as new industries choose to locate in Brundidge, the climate for industrial growth will continue to exist, Canfield said. Messenger photo/Jaine TreadwellCaraway announced a partnership with a new industry to locate in Brundidge and the expansion of his own business. You Might Like KNOW YOUR GUIDE: Salem Baptist Church kicks off Vacation Bible School weekend Messenger photo/Courtney PattersonSalem Baptist Church in Brundidge kicked off their “Journey Off the Map” Vacation Bible School Friday night with… read more Latest Stories Print Articlelast_img read more

Tigers tamed as Catz run in five

first_imgCatz 31 – 7 LMH/TrinityUPON promotion to the top flight, the last thing any side would want is to face a team that ran in over a hundred points in their last two fixtures. Unfortunately for LMH/Trinity, an in-form Catz were their opponents in the first game of the new league season.Dark clouds and driving rain greeted the Division One new boys, who arrived without any substitutes and therefore no margin for error in terms of injuries. Catz, too, had players out, but even their shallow strength in depth was more than enough to comfortably see off their newly-promoted visitors.With the home side coming into the game on the back of a second place league finish – the college’s best in years – they were looking to build towards going one better in the new season.Catz began by tearing into LMH from the kick off, immediately camping deep in their opponents’ twenty-two. The only reason for the home side being denied an early score was a slight lack of composure in front of the line.All that changed on ten minutes after some hard-hitting play in the midfield saw the ball find Catz outside centre Femi Fadugba. Embarking on one of his trademark jinking runs, Fadugba left the LMH defence trailing in his wake before touching down underneath the posts. Captain Sam Donaldson converted to give his side an early 7-0 lead.Catz barely let their opponents catch breath, running the ball straight back into the Tigers’ half and causing all sorts of problems for their defence. Good work from the home pack allowed the backs to put through Peter Jones for the first of his two tries. At this stage LMH were on the ropes, being repeatedly jabbed by their hosts. Time after time Catz would break the defence, with Donaldson adding to his points total with a try and another conversion.By now, even the St. Catherine’s forwards were after a piece of the action. Prop Tom Ward took a great inside ball before good work from hooker Charlie Thompson led to Matt Perrins touching down for the fourth try, plus conversion, of a punishing first half for LMH.The Tigers looked more fired up after the break and took advantage of a sleepy Catz to score a converted try of their own, but were immediately brought back down to earth with a second try from Jones.Injuries on both sides then brought down the quality of the game, with uncontested scrums being introduced thanks to a front row casualty. Catz came close to scoring a sixth, but Jamie Menzies was brought down just before the line.Their dominance of both the lineout and the tackle area meant that the Manor Road outfit would always create more chances, and wing Leo Masson forced good covering tackles from the Tigers’ defence. With LMH’s numbers dropping as low as twelve thanks to injuries, the referee brought matters to a close ten minutes ahead of schedule.On this evidence, the new members of elite rugby have a lot to do to retain their top flight status. Upcoming fixtures against Magdalen and champions Keble leave LMH with little chance of picking up any points before Christmas. Catz, though, will fancy their chances of improving on last season’s second after a strong start in poor conditions.last_img read more

Guide to impeachments at the Oxford Union

first_imgThe impeachment process is set out in the Rules, Standing Orders, and Special Schedules of the Oxford Union Society. In a letter, the Returning Officer stated: Image credit to US Department of State / Wikimedia Commons A candidate who has been impeached “shall be considered to have resigned from their office”. Impeached officers may run for office in the Union in the future. However, the Returning Officer is required to make the fact that the candidate has been impeached to members of the Union, describing the candidate as “Ex-Officer (impeached)”. Mr Price, Mr Xie and the Union have been approached for comment. “No verification process for signatures was required as neither online form for impeachment signatures received 150 responses.” The motions also highlight that both officers were involved in putting together a term card which has drawn criticism because of comments made by invited speakers which have caused controversy. The Oxford SU Disabilities and LGBTQ+ Campaigns both criticised the invitation of the Canadian neuroscientist Deborah Soh, who they accused of transphobia and denying “autistic trans people – and autistic people as a whole – agency over their lives.” If an impeachment motion receives the required 150 signatures, members will be able to vote on the motion four days later. This period exists to allow “free and open debate to occur” about whether the officers in question should be impeached and removed from office. Impeachment motions require a supermajority of two thirds to be passed. The number of votes to impeach the officer must be higher that 150.center_img There are special cases under which impeachment proceedings would be suspended, such as if the officer resigns. This happened in 2019 when former Union President Brendan McGrath resigned his post after Ebenezer Azamati, a blind postgraduate student, was ejected from the debate chamber and banned from the Union for two terms. The events drew widespread scrutiny and condemnation from the international media and press, and prompted an impeachment motion to be brought against Mr McGrath. “Motions of impeachment against the President and Librarian were affixed to the noticeboard at 00:02 on Sunday 7th February. Neither motion gained the required 150 signatures by the deadline at 00:02 today, Tuesday 9th February, and so are not considered moved under Rule 43.” In this specific instance, the articles accused Union President James Price and Librarian Chengkai Xie of attending a party which is alleged to have taken place in the Union in December. The Union’s solicitor has previously said that “to suggest that an illegal party was hosted would be untrue and defamatory. It is also untrue to say the police were called.” Ordinarily, once motions have been submitted to the Returning Officer, they are displayed on the Union noticeboard. The date and time at which the articles had been posted is also displayed, since 150 verified signatures need to be collected for the motion to proceed to a debate. Mr Xie is also accused of failing to interview all candidates for the Union’s Appointed Committee, which the former Treasurer claims contributed to “spirit of nepotism and exclusivity that is remiss of a society that serves the members rather than those in power”. Mr Price is accused of allowing this to take place by delegating this process to Mr Xie. Due to the pandemic, the motions are available to sign as Google forms. After being posted at 0:02 on the morning of February 7th, there is a 48 hour window in which members can sign. A spokesperson from the Union told Cherwell: “the Union does not publicise motions and it is up to the member who submitted it to collect signatures”. Motions of impeachment have been brought against the President and Librarian of the Oxford Union by a former Treasurer. While the motions have failed, with neither receiving the required 150 signatures, the impeachment procedures – especially in a remote term – can be unclear.last_img read more

Aqueous Shares Pro-Shot Video Of “Power Of Love” Cover At The Peach With Turkuaz Horns [Watch]

first_imgToday, as we all prepare to give thanks, Aqueous has released pro-shot footage of their memorable collaboration with the Turkuaz horns at last summer’s The Peach Music Festival. As the band notes regarding the newly released pro-shot video, “We’re releasing this as a huge thank you for all the amazing support we’ve had on the first half of the Color Wheel tour! We are really feeling the power of LOVE!”After opening their Mushroom Stage set with originals “Origami” and “Weight of the Word”, the Buffalo-based groove rockers welcomed the Turkuaz Horns, billed as one of the weekend’s “artists-at-large,” to add some brass for a sing-along cover of Huey Lewis and the News‘ hit, “Power of Love”. This marked Aqueous’ second-ever live rendition of the track, originally recorded as part of the soundtrack for 1985 blockbuster Back To The Future. You can watch the pro-shot video of the collaboration below:Aqueous w/ the Turkuaz Horns – “Power of Love” [Huey Lewis and the News cover, Pro-Shot][Video: Aqueous]After the round of 80s nostalgia, Aqueous continued their set with “The Median“, which they eventually guided into “Warren in the Window”. Finally, the band closed down their Peach set with a 22-minute rendition of their own “Don’t Do It” featuring teases of Dopapod‘s “Picture in Picture”. Below, you can watch the band’s official Peach Fest recap video, shot and edited by David Diller of Ninja Video:Aqueous – The Peach Music Festival – Official Recap Video[Video: AqueousBand; Shot and Edited by David Diller of Ninja Video]For a full list of Aqueous’ upcoming tour dates, head over to the band’s website here.Setlist: Aqueous | The Peach Music Festival | Montage Mountain | Scranton, PA| 7/21/18Set One: Origami, Weight of the Word, Power of Love (1), The Median > Warren in the Window, Don’t Do It (2)Set: Origami, Weight of the Word, Power of Love [1, 2], The Median > Warren in the Window, Don’t Do It [3]1- ft. Turkuaz Horns2- Picture in Picture (Dopapod) teaseNotes: [1] Bustout 276 shows | [2] ft. Turkuaz Horns | [3] contained a “Picture in Picture” (Dopapod) teaselast_img read more

Faculty Senate passes LGBTQ resolution

first_imgIn a push for improved inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) members of the Notre Dame community, the Faculty Senate passed two resolutions Tuesday, one supporting a gay-straight alliance and the other proposing adding sexual orientation to the University’s non-discrimination clause. Student Senate passed similar resolutions earlier this semester. Faculty Senate chair Morten Eskildsen said the group decided to address the two resolutions due to outside support of the measures. “We have received from a number of sides emails encouraging us to look into this issue and the Senate Executive Committee agreed this is something we would want to look at and discuss,” he said. “And we did.” During Tuesday’s meeting, Eskildsen said there was a “clear majority” in favor of passing the resolutions. He said there seems to be strong support among Notre Dame faculty for advancing LGBTQ rights on campus. “The documents brought forward show really that this was the right thing to do. Overall, people felt that gays and lesbians who were feeling sort of left out or marginalized, there was a desire to try and improve their situation,” he said. “That was the main sentiment of those arguing in favor of the resolutions.” Eskildsen said this was the first time the issues were formally discussed within Faculty Senate, but he speculated a GSA and the non-discrimination clause were the topic of “many conversations” amongst faculty. “I’m sure a lot of people have discussed this across campus,” he said. “It’s just my impression.” Eskildsen said a number of questions regarding the resolutions, including legal issues, arose during the debate of the resolutions. As such, he said he expects discussion to continue through the next academic school year. “I think the Senate felt it would be nice to see some of those questions addressed by for instance legal counsel or offices of the University,” he said. “While we passed those resolutions, I would also say there is a sentiment to look further into this issue.” Student body president Pat McCormick said he appreciates the efforts of the Faculty Senate to pass the resolutions at Tuesday’s meeting. “We’re grateful to the faculty for their support of this effort to create a group for both gay and straight students to come together for mutual support and service to the broader community,” he said. McCormick said members of student government anticipate working with Faculty Senate and others in the Notre Dame community to further the progress achieved this semester. “We look forward to partnering in whatever way we can with faculty and members of the administration and of course student advocates to continue to explore ways we might be able to further expand inclusion in the Notre Dame community,” he said. University spokesman Dennis Brown declined comment on the resolutions until the parties involved present such material to Notre Dame. “We are aware of the Faculty and Student Senate resolutions, but we’ll refrain from any specific observations until we’ve had a chance to thoroughly review material forwarded to us by a group of concerned students,” he said. Brown said Notre Dame continues to promote acceptance of LGBTQ students on campus. “We want to make it clear that, as articulated in the Spirit of Inclusion, we welcome and value all members of our community, we condemn discriminatory harassment of any kind, and our policy explicitly precludes harassment based on sexual orientation,” he said.last_img read more

Project addresses ideas of beauty

first_imgThe Identity Project of Notre Dame will address contemporary conceptualizations of beauty at this weekend’s Edith Stein Project Conference. Senior co-chair Samantha Stempky said the organizers discussed beauty as a broad concept and acknowledged “beautiful” is used to describe many different kinds of women. They chose “Modern Beauty: Unveiling the Mystery” as the conference’s theme. Stempky said the conference, which takes place today and Saturday, asks what it means to be beautiful. “No wonder we’re striving for this [idea of beauty] and never feel fulfilled, because nobody can be both Mother Teresa and Marilyn Monroe,” she said. Approximately 15 students, professors and professionals will present papers they submitted to the conference Saturday morning, senior co-chair Margaret Kennedy said. “That’s really cool because this is a full-scale academic conference, and yet students are able to participate,” she said. “[The papers] will be related to the conference theme in some way, from ‘a woman’s pursuit of beauty’ to more philosophical perspectives.” Kennedy said approximately 25 speakers from a variety of backgrounds will also speak at the conference, from magazine editors to professors from other universities. “Most of the people coming to the conference have a Christian background, but they’re not all religious talks,” Kennedy said. “They’re meant to be talks that deal with a combination of the academic side and the personal side.” Professors of theology Tim O’Malley and Fr. Michael Heintz will be among the presenters. The conference is about femininity, but these issues are relevant to men as well as women, Stempky said. Kennedy said although the conference originated to address feminine issues, men can also appreciate the talks. “As the conference expanded, we have as many sessions that deal with issues related to men as related to women,” Kennedy said. “That creates a really unique atmosphere where there’s this open engagement from both men and women.” The conference aims to generate discussion about the complex topic of beauty, Kennedy said. Stempky said although the conference will not concretely answer “What is beauty?,” it will give people tools to explore that question in their own lives. “It’s not like we have all the answers,” she said. “It’s more, ‘Here are some different aspects of this issue.’ It’s more to prompt your own thinking and reflection.” Stempky said the conference benefits from being hosted at the University. “It has this academic element, as well as the personal, contemporary element,” she said. “The place where I think those two things meet best is at Notre Dame.”last_img read more