County Council announces commercial rate freeze

first_imgWhatsApp Print Linkedin Facebook NewsLocal NewsCounty Council announces commercial rate freezeBy admin – December 15, 2008 538 Businesses in County Limerick were buoyed by the news today that Limerick County Council will not be increasing the commercial rate for a second year in a row. Announcing details of the Council’s Budget for 2009, the Limerick County Manager confirmed that the commercial rate for 2009 would remain at the 2007 level.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Mr. Ned Gleeson said that the decision would play an important role in sustaining existing jobs, and ensuring that Limerick remained an attractive location for investment.Mr. Gleeson continued, “Faced with the most challenging economic climate in a decade, extremely difficult decisions had to be made. In making these difficult choices I have been guided by a number of factors including the need to maintain essential services, statutory obligations that the Council must meet, direction from Government with regard to pay and non-pay items, and the need for the Council to give a lead in protecting employment and measures to enhance the Council’s economic performance.”He pointed out that the current Annual Rate on Valuation is one of the lowest of the thirty-four County and City Authorities in the country, as well as being the lowest in the Mid West Region.The total estimated expenditure included in the Draft Budget for 2009 amounts to €125.892 million.  This level of expenditure will be financed from Grants and Subsidies (30.85%), Goods and Services (27.57%),Commercial Rates (21.17%) and Local Government Fund Grant (20.41%).Commenting on the Budget, Councillor John Gallahue, Cathaoirleach of Limerick County Council said it was a very significant achievement to be freezing rates for a second consecutive year, and the property tax rate for the County was similar to 2007.center_img Twitter Email Previous article315 New Jobs for Mid-West RegionNext articleWork to begin on the great southern trail admin Advertisementlast_img read more

Internationally acclaimed singer to perform in Abbeyfeale

first_imgLinkedin Twitter NewsCommunityInternationally acclaimed singer to perform in AbbeyfealeBy Staff Reporter – February 5, 2018 1344 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Advertisement WhatsApp Previous articleHoran case a wake-up call for parentsNext articleMunster secure golfing victory in Vilamoura Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie TAGSChurch of Assumption AbbeyfealeFinba WrightFr Tony MullinsGolden Jubilee Print Finbar WrightA year of celebration for the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Church of Assumption Abbeyfeale will have a special curtain raiser this Friday when one of Ireland’s favourite signers, the internationally acclaimed Finbar Wright, stars.The classically trained Cork tenor will bring his uplifting repertoire to anticipated packed Church of the Assumption to start Golden Jubilee celebrations on a high. Having already performed in Abbeyfeale in 2008, it will be a popular return for a much loved artist.The entertainment value of the nigh will be raised by famed Uilleann Piper Ronan Browne, who will join Wright in what’s going to be a very special performance. The concert is the first in a series of events that across 2018 to mark the Jubilee of the opening of the church in Abbeyfeale.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up But it all starts on Friday with what will be a really special night for Abbeyfeale. Said Parish Priest Fr. Tony Mullins: “A lot of work went into building this Church, a huge amount of effort by the community, people who are still with us and some who are gone so it’s only right that we would celebrate their endeavour 50 years on. ”Remaining tickets for the concert can be reserved by telephone at 089- 4356981 and are also available at outlets in Abbeyfeale, including Moss Harnett’s Spar shop, Killarney Road, Twohig’s Supervalue, O’Donoghue’s Spar shop, Ann Lyon’s, The Square and Sean Broderick’s New Street. Tickets are also on sale in Templeglantine at Pat Buckley’s shop and the Post Office and in Newcastle West at All Seasons Ladies Fashions, Bridge Street, Newcastle West.More about community here. Email Bishop’s funeral tribute to Limerick parish priestlast_img read more

Aldi submits updated planning application for new store on Roches St.,…

first_imgWhatsApp ALDI Ireland has submitted an updated planning application for its planned new store on Roches Street, Limerick to Limerick City and County Council. The new store will create 30 permanent jobs once opened, as well as 100 jobs during the construction phase.The new planning application provides for a number of proposed changes to the original plans for the store.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The store will be constructed in Aldi’s award-winning Project Fresh design and will be powered by 100% green electricity. There will be 75 customer car parking spaces, with a mix of uses including an office on the first floor and the existing Eir surface car park relocated to the third floor.Aldi will also invest in the future of Limerick City through the provision of three free-to-use electric vehicle charging points outside the store.A study* of shoppers living or working within 2km of Aldi’s planned ‘Project Fresh’ store on Roches Street by leading independent market research agency Behaviour and Attitudes found overwhelming support for Aldi’s plans.87% of shoppers interviewed claimed they are happy to hear Aldi is planning to open a store in the area, with 89% stating they are likely to shop there.91% of shoppers surveyed in Limerick agreed Aldi had chosen a central convenient site on Roches Street, with 92% stating the opening of the store would generate much needed local employment. Nine out of ten (90%) believe the opening of Aldi will mean better value grocery shopping.Commenting, Colin Breslin, Aldi Regional Managing Director said: “We can’t wait to come to Limerick City Centre and bring our amazing prices to even more customers. The demand from shoppers in Limerick for the lowest prices in Irish retail is very clear.”“Our dedicated customers know that we won’t be beaten on price, and we are committed to providing the best value possible to shoppers. Our Swap & Save campaign reminds shoppers about the saving that can be generated by swapping their weekly shop to Aldi.”The new store will be Aldi’s fourth in County Limerick, with existing stores on Childers Road and Dublin Road in Limerick City, and a store in Newcastle West. Each store is part of Aldi’s food waste reduction programme, with Aldi’s Limerick stores having donated over 40,000 meals through FoodCloud to local charities.Each store is also part of Aldi’s Community Grants network, with The Butterfly Club, Barnardos Family Support Service Limerick South and the Irish Cancer Society some of the many local charities that have availed of the €500 bursary grant in recent years. Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live TAGSaldiKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Facebook Linkedin Twitter Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Emailcenter_img Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Previous article#Photos: Redemptorists Hamper Appeal 2020Next article#Video: Fresh Film & Local Creative Youth Partnership produce music video for Limerick band Bleeding Heart Pigeons Meghann Scully RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash LimerickNewsAldi submits updated planning application for new store on Roches St., LimerickBy Meghann Scully – December 17, 2020 2996 Print Advertisement Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limericklast_img read more

Biden choice for budget chief faces new hurdles in Congress

first_img Twitter WhatsApp Biden choice for budget chief faces new hurdles in Congress Pinterest Local NewsBusinessUS News Facebook WhatsApp FILE – In this Feb. 10, 2021, file photo Neera Tanden, President Joe Biden’s nominee for Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), appears before a Senate Committee on the Budget hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington.center_img TAGS  Pinterest Previous articleHeavy Snow and Chilly Temps Increase Pest Pressure Across U.S.Next articleStudy: college sports still trail pros in diversity hiring Digital AIM Web Support By Digital AIM Web Support – April 6, 2021 Twitter Facebooklast_img read more

CFPB Updates on Dodd-Frank, Qualified Mortgage Patch

first_img CFPB Dodd-Frank Patch Qualified Mortgage Act 2019-05-29 Seth Welborn Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Share Save Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Related Articles The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / CFPB Updates on Dodd-Frank, Qualified Mortgage Patch The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img CFPB Updates on Dodd-Frank, Qualified Mortgage Patch in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Tagged with: CFPB Dodd-Frank Patch Qualified Mortgage Act  Print This Post May 29, 2019 2,596 Views Previous: Britain’s Barclays Returning to U.S. Mortgage-Backed Securities Market Next: Technology Coming to Loan Applications The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has released its Spring 2019 rulemaking agenda, part of the Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions.Included in the Bureau’s rulemaking is a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to follow up on an interpretive and procedural rule that it issued in August 2018 to provide clarification regarding Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act of 2018 (EGRRCPA) amendments to the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA). These created “partial exemptions that allow certain insured depository institutions and insured credit unions not to report certain data points for some transactions.”The Bureau also announced several new projects down the line. According to the CFPB, after completing an assessment in October 2018 of its rules to implement Dodd-Frank Act requirements for international remittance transfers:The Bureau issued in April 2019 a request for information to gather information related to the expiration of a statutorily established exception in the Remittance Rule that permits insured banks and insured credit unions to estimate certain required disclosures and other potential remittance transfer issues and related topics. The Bureau also recently completed an assessment of rules implementing Dodd-Frank Act provisions that require mortgage lenders to determine consumers’ ability to repay loans and define certain ‘qualified mortgages’ that are presumed to comply with the statutory requirements.As part of its plan, the CFPB notes that it will be focusing its attention on the Qualified Mortgage “Patch” on loans that are eligible to be purchased or guaranteed by either Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.In addition, the CFPB will be reviewing existing regulations, such as, “conducting an assessment pursuant to section 1022(d) of the Dodd-Frank Act of its regulations to consolidate various mortgage origination disclosures under the Truth in Lending Act and Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act.”In May 2019, the CFPB published its plan for conducting reviews consistent with section 610 of the Regulatory Flexibility Act, and also “issued a request for information on the first such review, concerning the impact of certain regulations concerning overdraft services on small banks and credit unions.” Subscribe About Author: Seth Welborn Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agolast_img read more

JGLS Legal Aid Clinic Secures Favorable Interim Order For EWS Student Who Was Allegedly Wrongly Denied Admission To Modern School, Delhi [Read Order]

first_imgNews UpdatesJGLS Legal Aid Clinic Secures Favorable Interim Order For EWS Student Who Was Allegedly Wrongly Denied Admission To Modern School, Delhi [Read Order] Akshita Saxena8 July 2020 2:05 AMShare This – xThe Delhi High Court recently directed the Modern School, Vasant Vihar, Delhi, to keep one seat vacant in Class 1 until the matter relating to alleged wrongful denial of seat to a EWS category student is decided finally. The order was passed by a single bench of Justice Jayant Nath after hearing the submissions made by Advocate Nipun Arora, engaged by the Right to Education Team of…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Delhi High Court recently directed the Modern School, Vasant Vihar, Delhi, to keep one seat vacant in Class 1 until the matter relating to alleged wrongful denial of seat to a EWS category student is decided finally. The order was passed by a single bench of Justice Jayant Nath after hearing the submissions made by Advocate Nipun Arora, engaged by the Right to Education Team of the Legal Aid Clinic of the Jindal Global Law School, Sonipat, on behalf of the EWS student. Section 12 (1) (c) of the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act mandates reservation of a minimum of 25% of the seats at the entry level class for children belonging to economically weaker sections (EWS) and disadvantaged groups in all private unaided schools. The 6-yr-old EWS student was allegedly denied admission by the school on the ground that there is no vacancy of seats. The school further informed the parents of the child that admissions under the EWS quota are available only to nursery and pre-primary students. Stating that no action was taken by the Government authorities against such “illegal” stance taken by the school, the Legal Aid Clinic with the help of Advocate Arora approached the High Court seeking relief. They have submitted that after the admission applications were processed by the school, the Petitioner was allotted Modern School, Vasant Vihar, for enrolment in EWS category in the first standard under the RTE Act. “However, to the utter shock and dismay of the Petitioner, the Respondent No. 2 blatantly refused to honour the allotment in favour of the Petitioner. The officials of the Respondent No. 2 kept making 8 excuses and absolutely denied to perform their statutory duties under the RTE Act as well as violated the fundamental rights of the Petitioner,” the plea states. The Petitioner apprehends that the school is making frivolous excuses to avoid its duties and is in fact trying to allot the EWS seat to some other persons with wealthy background for undue pecuniary gain. The court has granted interim relief to the Petitioner and has issued notices to both, the Delhi Govt. as well as the Modern School, Vasant Vihar, returnable on July 23, 2020. The RTE cell of the Legal Aid Clinic has expressed their aspiration to further the cause of education and have said, “We wish to take this opportunity to reach out to parents and students who have been wronged by school authorities and government administration. Advocate Nipun Arora and Shruti Dahlan(Head, RTE Committee, Legal Aid Clinic) have worked closely on this matter and can be reached at [email protected] [email protected] any concerns, questions, queries or complaints.” Case Details: Case Title: Abdul Kalam (Minor) v. GNCT of Delhi & Anr. Case No.: WP(C) No. 3913/2020 Quorum: Justice Jayant Nath Appearance: Advocate Nipun Arora (for Petitioner); ASC Naushad Ahmed Khan (for State) Click Here To Download Order Click Here To Download Press Note Next Storylast_img read more

The Pandemic, Labour Rights, And The Supreme Court’s Judgment In Gujarat Mazdoor Sabha

first_imgColumnsThe Pandemic, Labour Rights, And The Supreme Court’s Judgment In Gujarat Mazdoor Sabha Gautam Bhatia3 Oct 2020 5:48 AMShare This – xOn 17 April 2020, a little under a month after the Covid-induced nation-wide lockdown had been imposed, the government of Gujarat issued a notification under Section 5 of the Factories Act. This notification exempted all the factories in the state of Gujarat from adhering to a set of workers’ rights guaranteed by the statute. Its effect was to increase the upper limit of working hours from…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginOn 17 April 2020, a little under a month after the Covid-induced nation-wide lockdown had been imposed, the government of Gujarat issued a notification under Section 5 of the Factories Act. This notification exempted all the factories in the state of Gujarat from adhering to a set of workers’ rights guaranteed by the statute. Its effect was to increase the upper limit of working hours from nine to twelve per day and forty-eight to seventy-two per week, shorten rest intervals, and halve overtime pay. The Notification was initially intended to run until 19 July, but was later extended to 19 October.Two trade unions challenged the Notifiction(s) before the Supreme Court. In an important judgment handed down today (Gujarat Mazdoor Sabha v State of Gujarat), a three-judge bench of the Court agreed with their arguments, and struck down the Notifications in their entirety (with a consequential direction to pay back-wages to those workers who had worked overtime on the reduced rates).Chandrachud J.’s judgment for the Court revolves around two axes, both of which are important from a constitutional perspective. The first is a statutory analysis of whether the pre-conditions under Section 5 were satisfied; and the second is a broader argument about the role of labour laws in a constitutional democracy.Section 5 of the Factories Act authorises the government to exempt any factory or class of factories from the provisions of the statute, in case of a “public emergency.” The Explanation to Section 5 defines “public emergency” as grave emergency that threatens the security of India (or any part of it) on account of war, external aggression, or internal disturbance. The State argued that the Covid-19 pandemic was “a public emergency”, caused by “internal disturbance”. Relying upon the Sarkaria Commission Report that had cited “epidemics” as examples of internal disturbances, the State therefore claimed that the manner in which Covid-19 had “disturbed the social order of the country” and caused “extreme financial exigencies”, justified the invocation of Section 5.The Court rejected this argument. It began by noting that in judicial review, the existence of a “public emergency” must be demonstrated as an “objective fact” (paragraph 8). Secondly, the Court held that a reading of the Section 5 made it clear that both expressions – “public emergency” and “internal disturbance” – were to be read conjunctively, and the presence of both had to be satisfied as a pre-condition to invoking the Section. The Court then examined the scope of each of the phrases. Noting the genesis of these terms in colonial-era legislation and Constitutional Emergency provisions, the Court held that the terms would have to be given a narrow meaning. As Chandrachud J. observed:Section 5 of the Factories Act authorises the government to exempt any factory or class of factories from the provisions of the statute, in case of a “public emergency.” The Explanation to Section 5 defines “public emergency” as grave emergency that threatens the security of India (or any part of it) on account of war, external aggression, or internal disturbance. The State argued that the Covid-19 pandemic was “a public emergency”, caused by “internal disturbance”. Relying upon the Sarkaria Commission Report that had cited “epidemics” as examples of internal disturbances, the State therefore claimed that the manner in which Covid-19 had “disturbed the social order of the country” and caused “extreme financial exigencies”, justified the invocation of Section 5.On this basis, the Court held that “mere financial exigencies … do not qualify as an internal disturbance.” (para 17) Indeed, given that the phrase “internal disturbance” was used alongside “war” and “external aggression”, the principle of noscitur a sociis required interpreting it in that context, and in situations of similar gravity (para 18).With respect to the phrase “public emergency”, the Court noted that its constituent phrase – a threat to the “security of India” – had been repeatedly interpreted in narrow terms by the Supreme Court, starting with the hoary old judgment of Romesh Thapar (para 20).Having traced the genesis and meaning of both terms, the Court then applied them to the case at hand:Even if we were to accept the Respondent’s argument at its highest, that the pandemic has resulted in an internal disturbance, we find that the economic slowdown created by the COVID-19 pandemic does not qualify as an internal disturbance threatening the security of the state. The pandemic has put a severe burden on existing, particularly public health, infrastructure and has led to a sharp decline in economic activities. The Union Government has taken recourse to the provisions of the Disaster Management Act, 2005.12 However, it has not affected the security of India, or of a part of its territory in a manner that disturbs the peace and integrity of the country. The economic hardships caused by COVID–19 certainly pose unprecedented challenges to governance. However, such challenges are to be resolved by the State Governments within the domain of their functioning under the law, in coordination with the Central Government. Unless the threshold of an economic hardship is so extreme that it leads to disruption of public order and threatens the security of India or of a part of its territory, recourse cannot be taken to such emergency powers which are to be used sparingly under the law. (para 28)This is an important paragraph. As noted on this blog before, terms such as “public emergency”, “security of the State”, and “internal disturbance” are broad in their ambit; if they are to act as any kind of check upon unbridled executive power, it requires the judiciary to give them concrete content, and then – given their extraordinary nature – to insist upon strict compliance with the legal threshold before the government can invoke emergency-style powers. This is what the Court did: instead of letting the nature of the Covid-19 pandemic expand to fill the content of these clauses, it first accorded these clauses an autonomous – and narrow – interpretation, and upon finding that the pandemic did not fall within that interpretation, struck down the offending State action. This is a refreshing change from the otherwise deferential attitude shown by the Court at the first recitation of “public emergency” and “national security”, including in many cases concerning State action during the pandemic.The Court also went on, however, to put its argument on a firmer – constitutional – footing. It located the Factories Act – and its guarantee of workers’ rights – in a long history of labour struggles (para 29), and grounded it within legislative recognition of the “inequality of bargaining power between workers and their employers” (para 30). Drawing upon the Directive Principles as interpretive guides, the Court noted that working hour guarantees and overtime payment had a constitutional foundation, as they came within the ambit of Articles 21 (right to life) and 23 (right against forced labour). Any restriction of those rights, therefore, would have to abide by the principle of proportionality. In the instant case, the Court found that the principle of proportionality had been violated:The impugned notifications do not serve any purpose, apart from reducing the overhead costs of all factories in the State, without regard to the nature of their manufactured products. It would be fathomable, and within the realm of reasonable possibility during a pandemic, if the factories producing medical equipment such as life-saving drugs, personal protective equipment or sanitisers, would be exempted by way of Section 65(2), while justly compensating the workers for supplying their valuable labour in a time of urgent need. However, a blanket notification of exemption to all factories, irrespective of the manufactured product, while denying overtime to the workers, is indicative of the intention to capitalize on the pandemic to force an already worn-down class of society, into the chains of servitude. (para 36)In other words, therefore, using the Directive Principles and the concept of a welfare-oriented democracy as an interpretive base, the Court (a) located the rights at issue within Articles 21 and 23, and (b) found that State action violating them failed to meet the test of proportionality.ConclusionThe judgment of the Supreme Court is important in two respects. First, it is an important pushback against the trend where the State’s invocation of “public emergency” and “national security” has marked both the beginning and the end of the argument in court. In Gujarat Mazdoor Sabha, the Court shows that simply by performing the normal judicial function – of interpreting phrases in accordance with their accepted meaning, and by measuring State action against that meaning – the government’s justifications will often fail on their own terms. More broadly, the Court’s insistence that the invocation of such clauses is for exceptional situations – and must therefore be adhered to strictly – is both welcome and important. This must be seen in the context of two competing judicial philosophies. The first philosophy holds that “public emergency” and “national security” constitute a kind of constitutional blackhole: their very invocation by the State requires the Court to virtually abandon its basic function of judicial review. The second philosophy holds that, as a matter of fact, it is precisely because of the sweeping powers afforded to the State in such circumstances, judicial review must be heightened, so that basic rights do not become (in the the words of the judgment) “paper tigers.” In recent times, we have seen far too much of the first philosophy, and far too little of the second – something that the Court corrects in this case.Secondly, the Court does not limit its arguments to the statutory framework. By using the Directive Principles as interpretive guides, it grounds core labour rights within Articles 21 and 23 of the Constitution, and subjects limitations to the doctrine of proportionality. This is equally important, because – as we have seen just recently – existing labour laws themselves have been replaced by new Labour Codes, which take a far more restrictive approach towards labour rights. The Court’s reminder that these rights are, ultimately, located in the Constitution, is therefore crucial as, in the coming days, questions will be raised about both the constitutionality – and the interpretation – of the new labour codes.Views are personal only.This article was first published here Next Storylast_img read more

Climate making air pollution worse, almost half of US exposed to unhealthy levels: Report

first_imgkodda/iStockBy STEPHANIE EBBS, ABC News(NEW YORK) — Almost half of Americans live in communities with unhealthy levels of air pollution, according to the American Lung Association, as the country continues to grapple with a respiratory virus that has brought more attention to the impact of air pollution on people’shealth.The American Lung Association’s “State of the Air” report found that 150 million Americans — 45.8% of the population — live in counties with unhealthy levels of ozone or tiny particle pollution — essentially soot or smog. The numbers have increased in the past three reports. “What we’re seeing is an actual increase in the number of people breathing unhealthy air in this year’s report compared to last year’s report. And that is a result, we believe, of climate change. And also lack of enforcement and compliance by the U.S. EPA of the Clean Air Act,” said Paul Billings, senior vice president of advocacy for the American Lung Association.“It shows we can’t take clean air for granted and that climate change is making the job of cleaning the air harder and it’s putting health burdens on the American people right now,” he added.A recent study from researchers at Harvard University found a link between high exposures to air pollution and pre-existing conditions that contribute to more severe outcomes from the novel coronavirus, raising more concern about the long-term impacts of pollution on public health.The report specifically looked at two types of air pollution regulated by state and federal governments: ozone released by vehicles, power plants, chemical and industrial facilities, and tiny particles known as “particulate matter” that can get into the air from construction sites, wildfires and smokestacks.Ozone is known to hurt lung function and worsen health conditions like asthma or bronchitis and particulate pollution can cause lung problems, heart attacks and contribute to premature death.The Environmental Protection Agency, the federal entity charged with regulating hazardous air pollutants and protecting human health and the environment, called the Lung Association’s report “pessimistic” and the methodology problematic in a statement. The agency said the report’s methodology does not take into account the challenges different cities and states face in cleaning up pollution and doesn’t recognize progress made over the years.“EPA methods for determining air quality, which are based on the Clean Air Act and the latest science, show continued improvements in measures of U.S. air quality in recent years and into the future,” a spokesperson said in a statement.The EPA estimates, using its own methodology, that despite significant improvements in levels of most regulated pollutants, approximately 137 million people lived in areas with pollution above the legal levels in 2018, according to the agency’s website.Catherine Flowers, a field activist in Houston with the advocacy group Moms Clean Air Force, says the concern about air pollution adds another level of anxiety as she watches friends and colleagues impacted by the COVID-19 virus in her home city of New Orleans.Flowers said she wants to see more accountability and awareness of the health problems associated with air pollution, especially among people with low incomes and in communities of color that are impacted the most.“Climate and air is an environmental justice issue and it’s — it’s literally tied to every social ill. I don’t think we’ve had the words before because, again, we’ve always focused on, you know, the most immediate issues. But the truth is, it’s a thread that’s woven throughout the cloth of every kind of — every kind of social service work we do,” she said.She said it can sometimes be difficult to get communities and officials to focus on issues like air pollution while in the midst of another crisis, but that she hopes the concerns about the disproportionate impact of both air pollution and COVID-19 on certain groups galvanize some action on the issue.“I remember after Hurricane Katrina and even after Harvey, you know, the news and just community leaders recognize that the storm pulled the veil off of what the issues were,” she told ABC News.“And so COVID once again demonstrates that we have real issues that need to be addressed. We can’t keep ignoring the problem,” she added.Three of the worst cities are all in California, according to the report, largely because of wildfire smoke and rising temperatures due to climate change that exacerbate pollution. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration expects 2020 to be one of the 10 warmest years on record, if not one of the five warmest years.Billings said the upward trend shows that we are already seeing the public health impacts of climate change.“Climate change creates the conditions to form both ozone and particle pollution, makes the job of cleaning up that pollution that much harder and we’re seeing clear evidence in our report of the impact of climate change, with more Americans exposed to more pollution on more days as a result of the immediate impacts we’re seeing of a warming planet,” Billings said.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Staff charge behind Irish boom

first_img The chief executive of a change management scheme has claimed its staff empowering strategies have contributed to Ireland’s economic turnaround.Dan Flinter claims companies involved in Enterprise Ireland have benefited from giving employees the chance to influence management decisions.He told delegates the scheme works because it allows a focus on customers.“Under this model, we have seen significant improvement in customer service – which must be the bottom-line for any scheme of this kind.”Enterprise Ireland was set up after the economic slump of the mid-80s. The scheme is run by the Government in partnership with industry. It establishes strategies for change, sets performance measures and gives staff a say in company policy. Staff charge behind Irish boomOn 26 Sep 2000 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Rightmove to launch tyre-kicker filtering service

first_imgRightmove is to launch a service that will enable agents to weed out tyre kickers as email and phone leads via its listings arrive from home hunters.The company says in its half year results today that its new Opportunity Manager is currently undergoing early trials, a service that will both train agents and provide them with behavioural data to analyse inbound leads.This announcement, which is part of the portal’s ongoing attempts to help agents spend more on its add-on services, comes as it reveals that the average revenue per agent (ARPA) increased by £76 to £987 a month over the past six months.TurnoverCompared to the same period last year Rightmove’s revenue increased by 10%, its profits by 12%, both of which were driven by growth within its estate agency and new homes divisions.And despite there now being two strong ‘No.2’s in the market which many thought might lead some agents to ditch Rightmove, the portal says its membership has remained stable, increasing slightly to 20,450.There were 139 million visits to its website, an average of nearly three visits every month by every adult in the UK.Rightmove’s figures also reveal that the company remains staggeringly profitable. During the first half of the year it turned over £131.1 million on which it made a profit of £101 million, or 87%.The portal also reveals that, because it’s shares are so expensive at nearly £4.93 each, it is to recommend to shareholder that they be subdivided into tenths in order to make them accessible to smaller investors and employees.Rightmove opportunity manager July 27, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Marketing » Rightmove to launch tyre-kicker filtering service previous nextMarketingRightmove to launch tyre-kicker filtering serviceAnnouncement comes today as the company reveals profits up 12% over past six months and ARPA that’s shot up by £76 a month.Nigel Lewis27th July 201801,655 Viewslast_img read more