Bishop James Magness, Suffragan for Armed Services and Federal Ministries,…

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Posted Aug 14, 2015 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing People Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori has announced the upcoming resignation (retirement) of Bishop James “Jay” Magness, the Sixth Bishop Suffragan for Armed Services and Federal Ministries of The Episcopal Church.“Bishop Magness has brought a new level of clarity, effectiveness, and responsiveness to the office, and has increased recruitment and raised awareness of the ministry of federal chaplains around The Episcopal Church,” Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori said. “He will be difficult to replace, and I am grateful this careful process of seeking a successor has begun.”Bishop Magness has served in this position since June 2010.“While continuing to enjoy good health and the thorough satisfaction of this ministry, I am keenly aware that I am approaching the age of mandatory retirement,” Bishop Magness commented. “It has been a privilege to have served as the Sixth Bishop Suffragan for the Armed Services and Federal Ministries, and an honor to serve our chaplains and their families.  As we move into a promising future I am confident that our church will choose a wise leader as our Seventh Bishop Suffragan for the Armed Services and Federal Ministries.”According to Article II Section 7 of the Constitution of The Episcopal Church, the Bishop Suffragan for Armed Services and Federal Ministries is elected by the House of Bishops and is a member of the staff of the Presiding Bishop. The bishop in this role is a suffragan to the Presiding Bishop, who, as primate and chief pastor of The Episcopal Church, holds ultimate constitutional and canonical responsibility for chaplaincies in the military and key federal institutions.Currently a search committee is preparing the profile for the position. The election is slated for the House of Bishops meeting in Fall 2016 with the consecration currently scheduled for early 2017.The position of Bishop Suffragan for Armed Services and Federal Ministries, formally known in the Constitution of The Episcopal Church as the Bishop Suffragan for the Armed Forces, includes not only the pastoral care and oversight for armed forces chaplains, military personnel and families, but also oversight of federal hospitals, prisons, and correctional facilities, as well as the Eucharist communities related to military installations.Magness was elected by the House of Bishops as Bishop Suffragan on March 24, 2010. Previously, Magness served as the Canon for Mission and Diocesan Administration in the Episcopal Diocese of Southern Virginia and in parish and diocesan ministry. He retired from the U.S. Navy in 2003 in the rank of Captain, serving as command chaplain of U.S. Joint Forces Command and fleet chaplain for the U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Prior to those assignments, from 1997 to 2000 he was on the Navy Chief of Chaplains’ staff as personnel manager of the Navy Chaplain Corps.For more information contact Bishop Clay Matthews, Office of Pastoral Development, at [email protected] Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop James Magness, Suffragan for Armed Services and Federal Ministries, to retire in 2017 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

Secretary General calls for prayers for the Anglican Consultative Council

first_imgSecretary General calls for prayers for the Anglican Consultative Council The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Consultative Council Frank Riggio-Preston says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments are closed. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem February 26, 2016 at 10:21 pm Is this one open to the Episcopal Church or not? Press Release Service February 27, 2016 at 10:21 am The short answer is yes. Please see some details here https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2016/02/26/episcopalians-urged-to-take-gospel-high-ground-after-primates-action/ Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments (2) Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Anglican Communion, Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN ACC16, Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Mary Frances Schjonberg says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Consultative Council will meet in Lusaka for its 16th triennial meeting in April, and the secretary general of the Anglican Communion, Archbishop Josiah Idowu-Fearon, is asking “all our members in every province, as well as our ecumenical partners, to join us in this prayer as we prepare for the meeting of this Instrument of our Communion.”The role of the Anglican Consultative Council (ACC) is to facilitate the cooperative work of the churches of the Anglican Communion, exchange information between the provinces and churches, and help to coordinate common action. It advises on the organization and structures of the Anglican Communion, and seeks to develop common policies with respect to the world mission of the church, including ecumenical matters.Gracious and Heavenly Father, we thank You for Your love for the whole world in the death, resurrection and Ascension of Jesus Christ. We bless You for Your Church Universal called to represent You to the world, and our Communion as a part of that Church. We praise You for the unity You give to the Church, and confess our faults that have created disunity. As we prepare for ACC-16 in Lusaka, we ask You O Lord that all who will represent their Provinces may be blessed with good health, holy wisdom and loving and healing words.We give thanks and pray for Archbishop Albert Chama, the Bishops and all our other brothers and sisters in the Province of Central Africa, that You will provide for all their needs as they prepare to host this meeting. We pray for the Anglican Communion Office staff in their preparations. When we encounter differences and difficulties, may Your Holy Spirit take pre-eminence and over-rule to Your glory and honour. So may all that we think, say and do, echo our Lord’s prayer that Your will be done on earth as in heaven. We pray all these through our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.Amen Rector Belleville, IL Posted Feb 25, 2016 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Forward Today: Grant us grace

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Posted Aug 16, 2017 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Racial Justice & Reconciliation Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Advocacy Peace & Justice, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Foreward Movement]Dear friends in Christ,Like many of you, I was shocked and saddened by images and news coming out of Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend. The presence of racism in our nation should shock no one, because racism has been the original sin of the United States from its founding. What I found shocking is the boldness with which white nationalists now pursue their racist agenda using Nazi symbols without apology or shame. And, sadly, many of these racists attempt to deploy Christian symbols in their campaign of fear and hatred.In thinking about writing this week’s message, I was tempted not to write about these events. After all, I wondered, what can one more white person say that hasn’t been said? But then I thought about the cost of remaining silent at a time when some misuse the Christian story and in a time when we Christians sometimes have trouble facing up to our own complicity and troubled history of racism.So, speaking as the leader of Forward Movement, let me suggest three things that might help us all in our effort to proclaim a Gospel of love in a world that is sometimes dominated by the din of hatred.First, we must remember that being a disciple of Jesus Christ is utterly incompatible with white supremacy and all forms of racism. So redoubling our work of discipleship is itself an inherent rejection of racism. I say this because a life of discipleship means daily prayer, and when we pray, God will guide us away from fear and hatred toward hope and love. A life of scripture study will remind us that God’s will is for all people to thrive and that Jesus Christ stands especially with those at the margins. A life of generous giving will show us that there is always more than enough, and that God’s love can only be magnified, never diminished. A life of evangelism will bless us with joy as we share the liberating news that all people are beloved and that Jesus Christ has offered himself for the salvation of the whole world.Second–here I am speaking to my fellow white people–rather than heaping scorn on others or imagining that this is a problem that afflicts only certain parts of the nation, we do well to look inside our own hearts. As with all sins, facing our shortcomings is never easy. As with all sins, God stands ready to forgive us if we but repent. “What sins of racism demand my repentance?” is the question we white people must relentlessly ask ourselves.Thirdly, we might take a careful and thorough inventory of our churches. Where is racism found in our churches? This is the most pernicious place for racism, because it directly undermines our Gospel witness, and for that reason it is crucial that we do an honest examination. How does the racial composition of my church differ from that of my neighborhood or town? What do the leaders of my church look like? How has my church stood with–or failed to stand with–those who are the victims of racism, hatred, and fear? Has my church benefitted from white supremacy, and, if so, what must we do to repent?Doing this work is hard, and if it’s easy, we’re not doing it right. The reward though is that we and our world become more Christlike, as all of God’s beloved children may flourish as the people God has created them to be. We can’t do this on our own, but with God all things are possible.Yours faithfully,Scott GunnExecutive Director The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Charlottesville, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Forward Today: Grant us grace Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

Episcopales alegan valores en toda una variedad de empeños contra…

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Poverty & Hunger Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Por David PaulsenPosted Oct 31, 2017 Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Invitados y voluntarios oran juntos durante uno de los desayunos gratuitos que ofrece la iglesia episcopal de Sn Lucas en Seattle, uno  de los varios ministerios para combatir el hambre en que participa la Iglesia Episcopal en todos los niveles. Foto de Sara Bates/San Lucas.[Episcopal News Service] En el cristianismo, el alimento es inseparable de la fe. [Esa unión] la subraya un amplio espectro de las enseñanzas bíblicas y de las tradiciones cristianas, desde el ayuno individual hasta la Última Cena de Jesús y la celebración de la eucaristía. El viaje de la fe es un trayecto del hambre a la plenitud.“Bienaventurados los que tienen hambre, por que ellos serán saciados”, dice Jesús en Lucas 6:21.Pero los seguidores de Jesús también fueron llamados a dar a los pobres, proporcionando alimento físico junto con el alimento espiritual de Jesús. Definir esa misión, para no decir cumplirla, puede ser difícil, y las iglesias y creyentes se han enfrentado desde los tiempos de Jesús con la pregunta de cuál es la mejor manera de abordar el problema del hambre. En la actualidad, el hambre física sigue siendo un azote persistente en el mundo, incluidos países de gran riqueza como Estados Unidos.‘Alimento y fe’Episcopal News Service inicia una serie en cinco partes sobre los empeños para combatir el hambre en el ámbito de la Iglesia Episcopal. Otros artículos se centrarán en despensas de alimentos, un comedor de beneficencia, un camión de alimentos y la intervención de la Iglesia en la defensa de los programas del gobierno que combaten el hambre. La segunda parte aparecerá el 6 de noviembre.La esperanza también se mantiene. Episcopal News Service la encontró en un programa de servicio a indigentes en Seattle, Washington, en el ministerio de un camión de comidas en Houston, Texas, y en un comedor de beneficencia en la ciudad de Nueva York.  Esos y otros ejemplos de soluciones al problema del hambre basadas en la fe forman el tuétano de la serie  “Alimento y fe” en este mes de noviembre, en el cual ENS cuenta las historias de varios empeños contra el hambre que se llevan a cabo en todos los confines de la Iglesia Episcopal.La necesidad está bien documentada. Más de 41,2 millones de estadounidenses y el 12 por ciento de las familias se definen como alimentariamente inseguros por carecer de acceso al alimento suficiente para mantener vidas activas y sanas, según la más reciente “Ficha descriptiva de la pobreza y el hambre” de Feeding America. Y el hambre no es solamente un problema de pobreza. Más de la mitad de todos los estadounidenses con inseguridad alimentaria viven en familias por encima del nivel de la pobreza.Ni es el hambre una emergencia súbita para muchas familias. Puede ser una realidad implacable e insuperable de la vida diaria.“Muchísima gente que vive por debajo o cerca del nivel de la pobreza se preguntan de dónde les llegará su próxima comida”, dijo Catherine Davis, encargada principal de mercadeo y comunicaciones de Feeding America, [organización] que distribuye alimento a través de sus bancos de alimentos a despensas de beneficencias tanto religiosas como seculares en todo el país.La Iglesia Episcopal hace énfasis en los empeños para combatir el hambre en todos los niveles. Las congregaciones en todas partes funcionan como despensas de alimentos y ministerios de comida para asistir a los necesitados con alimentos enlatados o un plato de sopa en cualquier momento. Existe la Despensa de la Gracia  [Grace Food Pantry] en Madison, Wisconsin, que ha distribuido alimentos a personas necesitadas durante 38 años. Existe Cosecha Abundante [Abundant Harvest] un ministerio episcopal relativamente nuevo de camión de comidas en el área de Houston que es parte de una congregación que se propone encontrar la comunión en torno a la mesa de la comida.Los voluntarios Clare Manthey y John Mitchell se disponen a servir el desayuno diario gratuito a través del ministerio Cocina de la Esperanza Comestible. Foto de Sara Bates/San Lucas.Para ministerios como éstos, el objetivo es hacer más que poner alimento en las bocas de los necesitados.“Es un testimonio para nuestra comunidad y nuestro barrio de lo que significa vivir una vida cristiana”, dijo Sara Bates, coordinadora de Cocina de la Esperanza Comestible [Edible Hope Kitchen] en la iglesia episcopal de San Lucas [St. Luke’s Episcopal Church] en Seattle, que sirve desayuno gratuito todas las mañanas a cientos de indigentes de su bario de Ballard.La lucha contra el hambre no es sólo local. El dinero donado al Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo [Episcopal Relief & Development] sostiene programas que combaten el hambre en lugares como Sudán del Sur. Las campañas denominacionales de promoción social procuran influir la política de EE.UU. sobre la mitigación del hambre, a través de la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales de la Iglesia Episcopal,  de maneras que reflejen los valores cristianos.En mayo, el obispo primado Michael Curry se unió a “Para un tiempo como éste”  [For Such a Time as This] una campaña ecuménica de oración, activismo social y ayuno, programada para el día 21 de cada mes durante el actual período congresional a fin de resaltar el cambio que pueden hacer en las vidas de personas que luchan con el hambre algunos programas gubernamentales , como es el Programa de Asistencia Nutricional Suplementaria, también conocido por SNAP [su sigla en inglés] o sellos de alimentos.Curry dijo a Episcopal News Service que, al alimentar tanto el cuerpo como el alma, la Iglesia estaba siguiendo los pasos de Jesús.“Jesús alimentó a 5.000 personas con pan físico y tangible porque estaban hambrientos. Al mismo tiempo, alimentó sus almas al enseñarles el camino del Evangelio”, expresó Curry. “Los sacramentos, la palabra de Dios, el culto, el estudio bíblico, los grupos de oración, alimentan el alma. Los comedores de caridad, las despensas de alientos, las distribuciones de alimentos ecuménicos e interreligiosos, los huertos comunitarios, alimentan el cuerpo. De estas formas, buscamos ponerle fin al hambre… hambre del cuerpo y hambre del espíritu”.Raíces bíblicas de los ministerios de alimentaciónJesús también alude a esta dualidad en las Bienaventuranzas: “Bienaventurados los que tienen hambre y sed de justicia, porque ellos serán saciados”, dicen Mateo 5:1-12.En griego, la palabra que se traduce [al español] como justicia era la misma para equidad, hacía notar la Rda. Jane Patterson, profesora asociada de Nuevo Testamento en el Seminario del Sudoeste en Austin, Texas. Sin embargo, la manera en que el mundo antiguo entendió el hambre y el ayuno era diferente de cómo la entendemos hoy.“La mayoría de la gente en el mundo antiguo estaban hambrientos la mayor parte del tiempo”, dijo Patterson a ENS, y los profetas plantearon el argumento moral de la alimentación de los hambrientos.La idea de Jesús como el “buen pastor” se basa en Ezequiel 34, dijo Patterson. Dios le pregunta a los pastores por qué se alimentan ellos, pero no cuidan del rebaño. Dios promete cuidar de sus ovejas, los israelitas, y “proporcionarles una tierra famosa por sus cosechas, y donde ellos no sigan siendo víctima del hambre ni el escarnio de las naciones”.La referencias a la abundancia y a la escasez continúan a través del Nuevo Testamento. Las palabras “hambre” y “hambriento[s]” se encuentran 19 veces en los evangelios. “Comer” aparece varias docenas de veces más. En Marcos 11:12-14, Jesús tiene hambre, pero no encuentra higos en la higuera, y condena el árbol a secarse. El hijo pródigo Lucas 15 está tan hambriento que codicia la comida de los cerdos, “pero nadie le da nada”. Y en Mateo 6:25, Jesús dice “no se preocupen por vuestra vida, lo que han de comer o de beber… ¿No es la vida más que la comida?”Para los discípulos, Jesús compartió la Última Cena en un momento de incertidumbre y cuando una gran injusticia estaba a punto de ocurrir, dijo Patterson. Hoy se vuelve a contar antes de cada eucaristía debido a la manera en que Jesús vinculó la comida con su próximo sacrificio, ofreciéndose como pan y vino.“El alimento es básico para la vida”, siguió diciendo Patterson, pero las necesidades espirituales son igualmente esenciales. Con frecuencia hay poca distinción entre las dos en la Biblia. “Las personas que están hambrientas necesitan alimentos reales, y también necesitan sostén espiritual”.Uno de los relatos evangélicos más conocidos es el citado por Curry, la alimentación de los 5.000 con sólo cinco hogazas de pan y dos peses tal como lo cuentan los cuatro evangelios. A ese milagro sigue la enseñanza de Jesús sobre “el pan de vida”.“El que a mí viene nunca tendrá hambre, y el que en mí cree no tendrá sed jamás”, dice en Juan 6:35.Los discípulos de Jesús “necesitaban que les enseñaran tanto como necesitaban el pan”, apuntó Patterson. Ella también enfatiza la naturaleza comunal del milagro. No se dice que Jesús multiplicara los panes y los peces. El milagro consiste en que todos los que estaban reunidos se alimentaron del poco alimento que había disponible, y nadie se quedó sin comer por darles a los necesitados.“En la economía de Dios, nunca las cosas se reducen a cero”, afirmó ella.Dar mucho, carecer de nadaLa Rda. Melanie Mullen, directora de reconciliación, justicia y cuidado de la creación de la Iglesia Episcopal, busca inspiración en Proverbios 28 en la lucha contra el hambre: “El que le da al pobre no carecerá de nada”.Mullen supervisa el Ministerio de Jubileo y la Ofrenda Unida de Gracias, dos programas a través de los cuales la Iglesia Episcopal brinda un apoyo económico substancial a las iniciativas para combatir la pobreza. El Ministerio de Jubileo se centra específicamente en la pobreza a través de su red de 600 centros de jubileo, los cuales ofrecen toda una gama de servicios, que incluyen alimento, albergue y atención sanitaria.La Ofrenda Unida de Gracias o UTO [por su sigla en inglés] recoge donaciones de individuos a través de la Iglesia Episcopal y distribuye el dinero a una amplia variedad de ministerios valiosos, muchos de ellos ministerios de alimentación.Este año se otorgaron más de $1.200.000 en subvenciones de la UTO. Entre los beneficiarios se incluían una granja dirigida por la Diócesis de Ohio, un huerto de una iglesia en Connecticut y ministerios de alimentación en California Central. Los ministerios de alimentación regularmente se benefician de subvenciones de la UTO, tal como los $12.500 otorgados en 2016  en apoyo de este huerto en la iglesia episcopal de Santiago Apóstol [St. James] en Kent, Washington.La Iglesia Episcopal puede ejercer su liderazgo desde una posición de claridad moral basándose en las enseñanzas de Jesús, dijo Mullen.“Cuando ayudamos a los pobres no sólo estamos haciendo una obra de caridad, estamos viviendo como Jesús dijo”, afirmó ella.La Iglesia Episcopal, a través de la Comunión Anglicana, también promueve una red mundial de creyentes dispuestos a dar su dinero, a apoyar a extranjeros que necesitan ayuda para poner comida en la mesa. El Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo desempeña un papel protagónico en esos empeños en nombre de la Iglesia Episcopal.Mitigar el hambre es un área esencial de la obra del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, con un énfasis en lo programas comunitarios. “Estos programas que se elaboran localmente abordan el contexto específico de los hambrientos y tienen un impacto más amplio en la salud y el bienestar económico de la comunidad”, dice el sitio web de la agencia. “Al trabajar con iglesias asociadas y organizaciones locales, capacitamos a las personas para vivir vidas más sanas y productivas”.El Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo pudo gastar $6,9 millones en seguridad alimentaria en 2015 y casi $4 millones en 2016, según los informes anuales de la agencia, con la ayuda de episcopales que han sido económicamente generosos a través de los años.Hay también al parecer ilimitados ejemplos de episcopales que trabajan en sus propias comunidades para ayudar a sus vecinos a poner alimentos en la mesa.El ministerio de alimentación de la iglesia de San Lucas en Seattle comenzó hace unos 30 años como un almuerzo semanal comunitario, la labor de amor del grupo de estudio bíblico de la iglesia. Más recientemente también ha ayudado a salvar la congregación, que se esfuerza por sobrevivir luego de sufrir una importante división debido a la ordenación de homosexuales.En 2011, la iglesia perdió aproximadamente el 80 por ciento de sus miembros en esa división, lo cual redujo la asistencia al culto a una docena de personas algunos domingos, dijo Bates. Entre los que se quedaron estaban las mujeres mayores que se encargaban del ministerio de alimentación de la iglesia, y que estaban decididas a mantenerlo.La iglesia episcopal de San Lucas en Seattle, Washington, donde se sirve diariamente un desayuno gratuito al que acuden cientos d personas cada semana, ha visto un aumento de la indigencia en su barrio de Ballard. Foto de Sara Bates/San Lucas.Por ese tiempo, la comida se había convertido en un desayuno que se servía cinco días a la semana, en tanto el grupo notaba la presencia de más y más indigentes en el barrio, pero sin programas de alimentación en la mañana. Hace un par de años, según las comidas se fueron haciendo cada vez más populares, tomaron el nombre de Cocina de la Esperanza Comestible a partir de la sugerencia de uno de sus clientes habituales.“Él les dijo, ‘chicos, ustedes no sirven aquí solo comida. Ustedes sirven esperanza comestible’”, recordaba Bates.Ella comenzó a trabajar en la iglesia como pasante en 2015, poco después llegó un nuevo vicario y empezó a inyectar nueva vida en la congregación. Bates, de 33 años, ahora trabaja 20 horas a la semana pagada por la iglesia como coordinadora de la Cocina de la Esperanza Comestible gracias a una subvención de $22.000 que San Lucas recibió de la UTO este año.San Lucas consigue la mayor parte de sus alimentos de donaciones o a costo reducido de un banco de alimentos afiliado a Feeding America en Seattle. La subvención de la UTO también ayudará a que la iglesia actualice el equipo de su cocina. Comprar, por ejemplo, una nueva cortadora de pan es una gran mejora, porque Esperanza Comestible ofrece ilimitadas tostadas de hogazas pan que con frecuencia llegan sin rebanar.El objetivo es poder alimentar hasta 250 personas entre las 7 y la 10 A.M. todos los días hábiles este [próximo] invierno. Eso significa muchísimas tostadas. La iglesia también consume por lo menos seis docenas de huevos al día, y a veces hasta 14 docenas. De cuatro a 10 voluntarios preparan las comidas la noche anterior, y alrededor de una docena de personas cada mañana las instalan, las sirven y luego se ocupan de la limpieza.“Sinceramente, no debería ser posible hacer todo lo que hacemos con lo que tenemos. Es verdaderamente milagroso”, dijo Bates.Las comidas han ayudado a conectar dos grupos en el barrio —los indigentes y los pudientes— que de otro modo pueden encontrar pocos motivos para relacionarse. Bates cree también que el ministerio de alimentación es una de las razones por las que nuevas personas están descubriendo la congregación y haciéndose miembros, especialmente jóvenes y familias. La Cocina de la Esperanza Comestible les ofrece un modo de estar activos en su fe, afirmó ella, haciendo notar que la asistencia el domingo a San Lucas ahora llega a ser a veces de 80 personas.“No es siempre conveniente tener 200 personas indigentes en nuestra propiedad. No siempre resulta limpio y cómodo, y sin embargo queremos que sea un lugar donde todos nuestros vecinos se sientan acogidos y cómodos”, dijo Bates. “Nos sentimos muy, pero muy llamados a alimentar a nuestros vecinos hambrientos”.– David Paulsen es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Pueden dirigirse a él a [email protected] Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Episcopales alegan valores en toda una variedad de empeños contra el hambre, desde comedores de beneficencia hasta ayuda global Alimento y fe: ENS inicia una serie sobre la lucha contra el hambre Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

El cambio virtual de Nuevo Amanecer en medio de la…

first_img Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA El COVID-19 forzó que la conferencia bienal de Nuevo Amanecer se ofreciera en línea, un giro que ha aumentado el alcance global de la popular conferencia de los Ministerios Latino/Hispanos. Imagen de: Millard CookRead this article in English here. [Servicio Episcopal de Noticias] Cuando la pandemia del coronavirus obligó a los organizadores de Nuevo Amanecer a ofrecer la popular conferencia bienal de los Ministerios Latino/Hispanos en línea, no esperaban atraer la participación mundial.Históricamente, la mayoría de los asistentes a la conferencia han venido de Estados Unidos, ya que las restricciones de visado y los costos de viaje prohíben una participación más amplia de América Latina y más allá. Pero al adaptar rápidamente la conferencia de tres días en persona a un formato en línea celebrado un sábado al mes durante seis meses, Nuevo Amanecer casi ha duplicado su participación y ampliado su audiencia.Sorprendentemente, los organizadores descubrieron que el 49% de los participantes fue de América Latina y el Caribe, Europa y África y se unieron a la conferencia virtual mediante computadoras, teléfonos inteligentes y tabletas. Alrededor de 700 personas se han registrado para la conferencia virtual 2020, en comparación con 462 participantes en persona en 2018.“Hemos aprendido que tenemos un alcance más amplio virtualmente”, dijo Luis Enrique Hernández Rivas, co-coordinador de Nuevo Amanecer. “Es increíble cómo funciona el espíritu”.Ahora en su octavo año, Nuevo Amanecer, celebra y ayuda a los Ministerios Latino/Hispanos  de toda la Iglesia Episcopal al brindarles a los participantes oportunidades para establecer contactos y crecer juntos en el discipulado. Se han realizado conferencias previas en Kanuga, un campamento y centro de conferencias en Hendersonville, Carolina del Norte.La conferencia de seis sesiones se organiza en torno al tema: “He aquí que hago nuevas todas las cosas” (Apocalipsis 21: 5), que pide a los latinos episcopales y a los involucrados en el ministerio latino a pensar en cómo construir una nueva Iglesia en los tiempos modernos. Cada sesión sucesiva se centra en un tema más pequeño.“Este Nuevo Amanecer virtual realmente está tratando el tema de la Revelación”, dijo al Servicio Episcopal de Noticias el reverendo Juan Sandoval, archidiácono en la Diócesis de Atlanta y diácono para los ministerios hispanos y la atención pastoral en la catedral de San Felipe. “¿Quién iba a saber que iba a ocurrir la pandemia del COVID-19 y que realmente teníamos que hacer que todo fuera nuevo?”La primera sesión de la conferencia, celebrada en mayo, se centró en el COVID-19, mientras que la sesión de junio lo hizo sobre la evangelización digital. La tercera sesión, programada para el 11 de julio a la una de la tarde, tiempo del este, se centrará en el liderazgo de las mujeres en la Iglesia y presentará a la Muy Reverenda Miguelina Howell, decana de la catedral Christ Church en Hartford, Connecticut, como la oradora principal. Howell es la primera decana latina de una catedral en la Iglesia Episcopal. The Episcopal Church.Los temas de las tres sesiones restantes cubrirán la inclusión de latinos en la Iglesia y una celebración del 50 aniversario de los Ministerios Latino /Hispanos, coincidiendo con el Mes de la Herencia Hispana, Hispanic Heritage Month, que se celebra del 15 de septiembre al 15 de octubre.El equipo de planificación de Nuevo Amanecer había considerado cancelar o posponer la conferencia 2020, pero decidió hacerla virtual para que los participantes registrados y todos los demás interesados ​​pudieran participar en la formación y el compañerismo.“[El] coronavirus nos llegó bastante rápido esta primavera, y tuvimos que decidir en un corto período de tiempo cómo íbamos a mantener Nuevo Amanecer”, dijo el reverendo Anthony Guillén, misionero de los Ministerios Latino /Hispanos de la Iglesia Episcopal y director de ministerios étnicos. “¿Lo cancelamos? ¿Esperamos dos años más o hacemos algo virtualmente?”Los Ministerios Latino /Hispanos de la Iglesia Episcopal brindan orientación para fortalecer y apoyar a las comunidades de habla hispana en la tradición anglicana. Los esfuerzos incluyen ayudar en la plantación de iglesias, proporcionar recursos bilingües para individuos y congregaciones, y ofrecer oportunidades educativas para que los miembros de la Iglesia sirvan a sus comunidades latinas locales.Los ministerios parroquiales individuales varían. Por ejemplo, los esfuerzos pueden incluir cultivar jardines comunitarios, dar dinero y detergente para ayudar a los feligreses a lavar la ropa, servir comidas a los hambrientos, abogar por una reforma migratoria integral, ofrecer refugio a los inmigrantes indocumentados y ayudar a los trabajadores agrícolas, farmworkers.“El ministerio latino es el ministerio de la Iglesia”, dijo Rivas. “La conferencia ciertamente se enfoca en el ministerio entre los latinos, pero no solo las personas de América Latina hacen el ministerio latino. Todos están invitados y pueden sentirse capacitados a través de esta conferencia. … Estas oportunidades benefician por igual a latinos y no latinos”.Nuevo Amanecer no es exclusivo para latinos e hispanohablantes. Pueden participar personas de todas las razas y etnias. Para los que no pueden asistir a las sesiones en vivo, las grabaciones están disponibles en la página de Facebook de los Ministerios Latino /Hispanos de la Iglesia Episcopal y en  latinosepiscopales.org.“Para mí, Nuevo Amanecer significa una oportunidad de aprender más sobre lo que otros ministros e iglesias están haciendo, cómo adoran y quizás nuevas oraciones, nuevos servicios y nuevas caras”, dijo Sandoval. “La creación de redes es mi parte favorita de Nuevo Amanecer, y siempre me doy cuenta que puedo reunirme con conocidos anteriores y [hacer] otros nuevos”.Esto ayuda a mantener frescos los ministerios y las amistades para latinos y no latinos. Nuevo Amanecer también ayuda a los no latinos que sirven en estos ministerios a comprender mejor las culturas latinas y a aprender cómo adaptar la adoración a diferentes circunstancias.“Una de las cosas que más nos preocupaba era: ¿Cómo fomentamos virtualmente el sentido de comunidad y nuevas relaciones e incluso ofrecer reuniones plenarias, adoración y talleres?” le dijo Guillén al Servicio Episcopal de Noticias. “Algunas personas dicen que Nuevo Amanecer es como una gran reunión familiar. Es un momento para que las personas en el ministerio se reúnan, establezcan contactos, establezcan conexiones y aprendan unos de otros”.La sesión virtual de junio, que Guillén organizó, celebrada el 13, comenzó con la bienvenida y la adoración, seguida de una sesión plenaria, titulada “Evangelismo digital y el futuro de la Iglesia”. Luego, los participantes hicieron la transición a cuatro talleres separados de suelección: “Haciendo ´cosas nuevas´ en la Iglesia”, “Tecnología a su alcance”, “Cómo evangelizar en YouTube” y “Cómo transmitir eventos en vivo”. La mitad de los talleres se ofrecieron en español y la otra mitad en inglés.Durante la parte del taller, los asistentes se dividieron brevemente en salas de trabajo para colaborar en una lista de soluciones a los problemas que abordaron los líderes de su taller. Después de otro breve descanso de transición, los participantes colaboraron en una hora de café virtual para establecer contactos y compartir lo que aprendieron. La sesión mensual total duró tres horas. Las sesiones futuras se estructurarán de manera similar.Nuevo Amanecer también ofrece a los niños una lista de reproducción de actividades tradicionales de la escuela dominical antes de comenzar para que puedan participar mientras sus padres asisten a la conferencia.Adialyn Milien, líder del equipo de comunicación y redes sociales de Nuevo Amanecer, dijo que espera con más interés la sesión final de octubre porque la oradora principal será Ana Victoria Lantigua Zaya, una mujer de la República Dominicana de unos 20 años que sirvió en el equipo de planificación de la Juventud Episcopal en 2019. Episcopal Youth Planning Team in 2019“Ella terminará la serie porque queremos que la gente entienda que hay espacio para todos en la Iglesia Episcopal; todos son bienvenidos y pueden desempeñar un papel en la Iglesia”, dijo Milien. “En su mayoría tenemos viejos blancos en posiciones de poder, por lo que le estamos diciendo a la gente que el futuro de la Iglesia está en nuestras manos, especialmente en la comunidad latina”.Una vez que termine la pandemia del COVID-19, las conferencias de Nuevo Amanecer volverán a Kanuga, pero también habrá un componente virtual disponible para los que no puedan asistir en persona.“Algún día volveremos a los edificios de la Iglesia, y muchos querrán hacerlo, pero no creo que sea lo mismo”, dijo Rivas. “Hemos abierto las puertas de la Iglesia a muchas personas nuevas en todo el mundo, y ahora son parte de nuestra familia”.– Shireen Korkzan es reportera independiente con sede en el Medio Oeste que escribe principalmente sobre temas de religión, raza, etnia y justicia social. Síguela en Twitter e Instagram @ smkrm5. Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Por Shireen KorkzanPosted Jun 29, 2020 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC El cambio virtual de Nuevo Amanecer en medio de la pandemia del COVID-19 refleja el cambio y el crecimiento en los Ministerios Latino/Hispanos Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Hispanic and Latino Ministries Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

Apopka Police Department provides medication collection

first_img UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 From APD NewsThis week the Apopka Police Department (APD) installed a medication collection box in the lobby of the police department – part of progressive efforts to combat the addictive and deadly impacts of opioids.The APD is joining more than 3,000 law enforcement agencies across the United States to tackle this growing drug epidemic, which reaches all segments, ages, and incomes in our communities.The collection box is a secure green container bolted into the police department lobby, 112 E. Sixth St. Expired or unneeded prescriptions may be placed in the box during business hours (Monday through Friday from 7:00 am – 6:00 pm). Anyone needing assistance will be aided by an Apopka officer or clerk. The collection box is a safe, simple, secure and environmentally friendly way to help law enforcement agencies and communities collect unwanted or expired household medication, including prescriptions, over-the-counter drugs, and unused pharmaceuticals. Unused medications should not be flushed down toilets or sinks; this practice can introduce drugs into our reclaimed water system and sometimes appear in potable underground water sources.Do not dispose of drugs in the garbage for curbside collection. That makes drugs available for theft and illegal use.Prescriptions (patches, ointments, pills, etc.) will be collected along with non-prescription medications, such as cold medicines, aspirins, and other over-the-counter medications.Hazardous materials, aerosols, needles, and other items are not able to be collected through the collection box. This drop-off program is part of an overall strategy by the APD to combat the opioid problem growing throughout Central Florida and national communities. “Prescription medication abuse is a rising problem in the community,” said Apopka Police Chief Michael McKinley,” we hope to provide a simple method to dispose of prescription narcotics and other medications so they don’t fall into the wrong hands and become abused.” Often teenagers and other family members take legitimate prescription medications from their relatives. Medications at home should be secured, and when no longer needed, they should be disposed of in a safe and secure manner. The installation of this secure collection box at the police department will provide members of the community the ability to remove the medications from their home and ensure they will be destroyed appropriately. In a separate effort, the APD is issuing Naloxone kits (more commonly known as Narcan) and training officers to help save lives from increasingly common opioid overdoses. Opioids often are prescription painkillers such as morphine, methadone, hydrocodone, and oxycodone. Heroin also is an illegal opioid. The majority of drug overdose deaths (more than six out of ten) involve an opioid. From 2012 to 2016, the Orange-Osceola Medical Examiner’s Office reported an increase from 98 to 189 opioid-related deaths. Since 1999, the number of overdose deaths across the country involving opioids (including prescription opioids and heroin) quadrupled. With the increase in prescription opioids and the law enforcement efforts making heroin more and more difficult to obtain, prescription abuse has become more prevalent over the last few years. Additionally, with synthetic narcotics becoming more powerful and available, (such as fentanyl), communities have seen an increase in abuse and overdoses. An estimated 91 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.As a community-wide effort, Apopka can help to control the spread of opioids. For questions, contact the APD at 407-703-1771. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here TAGSApopka Police Department Previous articleFlorida Hospital Apopka in the final stages of starting a new eraNext articleWinners announced for Takeout Waiter gift certificates from The Apopka Voice Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your comment! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

This day in Florida history: Skyway Bridge collapses

first_img We used to go out into the Gulf of Mexico nine miles out to a ship that used to be a Russian hospital ship that had been sold and made into a casino. We used to go out at John’s Pass at Madeira Beach, on the west coast on a fast ferry boat that took us out nine miles into international waters where you could gamble on the big ship anchored out there that was 5 stories high and then stay out there as long as you wanted. These fast ferry boats where coming and going day and night multiple times a day and night. Once as we got back to John’s Pass our ferry hit the pilings that were in the channel as the wind had gotten rough. I thought about the ship that hit the Sunshine Bridge. It was minor, but kind of scary…….. May 9, 2017 at 8:31 pm Reply Mama Mia Mama Mia That lone survivor of the bridge accident, Wesley MacIntire, actually drove over the bridge again, and he and his wife tossed 35 white carnations into the, to honor the others that had died, and he was the last to drive over the old bridge before it was demolished……If I had of survived that driving off into the waters below, I WOULD OF NEVER EVER, GOT BACK ON THAT BRIDGE AND DRIVE OVER IT AGAIN!!!!!!! Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Mama Mia Reply Reply The Anatomy of Fear Mama Mia Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your name herecenter_img  May 9th, 1980Freighter crashes into column, 35 people dieFrom WikipediaAt 7:33 a.m. on May 9, 1980, the freighter MV Summit Venture collided with a pier (support column) of the Sunshine Skyway Bridge during a blinding thunderstorm, sending over 1,200 feet (370 m) of the bridge plummeting into Tampa Bay. The collision caused six cars, a truck, and a Greyhound bus to fall 150 feet into the water, killing 35 people.One man, Wesley MacIntire, survived the fall when his pickup truck landed on the deck of the Summit Venture before falling into the bay. He sued the company that owned the ship and settled for $175,000 in 1984. The pilot of the ship, John Lerro, was cleared of wrongdoing by both a state grand jury and a Coast Guard investigation. The south main pier (the one that required reinforcement before completion) withstood the ship strike without significant damage. It was the second pier to the south of it that was destroyed, a secondary pier that was not designed to withstand a large ship strike.After the Summit Venture disaster, the southbound span was used as a temporary fishing pier and the northbound span was converted back to carry one lane in either direction until the current bridge opened. Before the old bridge was demolished and hauled away in barges, MacIntire (the only survivor in the collapse) was the last person to drive over it. He was accompanied by his wife, and when they reached the top of the bridge, they dropped 35 white carnations into the water, one for each person who died in the disaster. Both the main spans of both the intact northbound bridge and the damaged southbound bridge were demolished in 1993 and the approaches for both old spans were made into the Skyway Fishing Pier State Park. These approaches sit 1⁄2 mile (800 m) to the south and west of the current bridge. The approaches of the 1950 span were demolished in 2008.Governor Bob Graham’s idea for the design of the current bridge won out over other proposals, including a tunnel (deemed impractical due to Florida’s high water table) and a simple reconstruction of the broken section of the old bridge that would not have improved shipping conditions. The new bridge’s main span is 50% wider than the old bridge. The piers of the main span and the approaches for 1⁄4 mile (400 m) in either direction are surrounded by large concrete barriers, called “dolphins“, that can protect the bridge piers from collisions by ships larger than the Summit Venture like tankers, container ships, and cruise ships. May 9, 2017 at 8:18 pm After that we had to go to St. Pete at the marina and get ferried from there, and we got to ride out under the Sunshine Skyway Bridge, the newer one. You could really see the huge “dolphins” or concrete barriers. to keep the ships from hitting the newer bridge. We got to see real dolphins out there too circling and jumping, and it was a fun experience just riding out nine miles to the ship. We would come and go day and night. They served beer and snacks that was free on the ferry, and talking with others was a lot of fun going out there…….the Jewel Casino ship filed bankruptcy I heard and shut down operations. Their fuel bill was enormous for filling the ferry boats up constantly. They didn’t even charge for the ferry rides. It was so much fun, and we could wander around and get lost on the big ship. They had plenty of business. On the east coast you only have to go out 3 miles into international waters to gamble. Oh, remember when this happened! My husband, my mother, and I used to go places and several times we would drive over that bridge, the one that the section fell after the ship hit the supports of the bridge. I would close my eyes and get a strange feeling. I really feared that high bridge, and also the one that was in Savannah, GA., an old high bridge. When the Sunshine Bridge accident happened, I got a eerie feeling. Later on, we drove over the replacement bridge, and I still didn’t like it, but it was not as scary. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. May 9, 2017 at 8:12 pm May 9, 2017 at 8:42 pm Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSSkyway Bridge Previous articleDid Apopka miss an opportunity for greatness?Next articleHow does a dermatologist protect her skin from the sun? Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate 4 COMMENTSlast_img read more

At a loss over school shootings

first_img February 18, 2018 at 10:49 pm Reply Reply TAGSDon LindseyInspiration Previous articleProblems?  Or Challenges and opportunities!Next articleTwo people, three opinions… Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here charles towne Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate The Anatomy of Fear I am going to paraphrase here but I am reminded of this thought, “The man that sees evil and does nothing about it is part of the problem, not the solution. Guns are not the problem, people are the problem. Responsible parenting is a good deal of the solution. As long as parents leave the rearing of their children to the teachers there are going to be problems. A gun free state is not the solution because the criminals are always going to acquire guns. I believe that in almost, and I said almost, every case of criminal use of guns, if you look close enough at the family dynamics you will find the underlying cause. A RESPONSIBLE PARENT A RESPONSIBLE PARENT The VOICE of InspirationBy Don LindseyThe shooting on Valentine’s day at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland left me feeling a lot like so many others that heard the news.  There was, and still is, a great deal of empathy and sadness for those and the families of those hurt or killed.  There’s also a considerable concern as a parent because that shooting was reportedly the 18th such incident so far this year.  I am beginning to worry when my kids go to school in the morning and that I think speaks volumes for itself.Given what I’ve seen from interviews and other media coverage, I know that I’m not alone in my concern.  Watching the events from Wednesday play out was a severe warning that these types of horrendous acts can happen anywhere.  According to multiple news broadcasts that I watched on the shooting, Parkland was a quiet community, and various residents that I saw interviewed were shocked that something like that would happen in their town.   While it is essential to understand the fact that these attacks do not discriminate and can happen anywhere, I also think that the number of these type of events that have occurred so far this year is the most concerning.I know that there will be a lot of political discussion about gun control, mental health and other factors that we usually see when a tragedy such as this happens. A debate about these issues is always good, but I’m not going to go in a political direction with this article and to be honest, I’m not sure how I feel anymore.  I grow more and more concerned each time a human being finds the hate in their heart to kill other human beings.  More than that, the alarming rate that these attacks are happening at, leads me to worry that we’re heading in a direction that we may not be able to recover from. A direction that is driven by hate and fear.I don’t believe that we have to live with that hate or fear.  I still have hope that my children and their peers will learn from our mistakes and the state of the world around them now and make choices to bring back a more selfless mindset.As I’ve mentioned before in past articles, I see examples of a great future every day in my children.  I see them strive for getting the most out of their lives while still worrying about those around them.  We have had quite a bit of conversation about the February 14th shooting.  They’ve put my mind at ease with explaining all of the safety protocols that their schools use to keep them safe.It crushes me that in this day and age a shooting drill is just as important as a tornado drill but am very grateful that the schools have plans in place to combat dangerous situations.  I also saw the hurt in their eyes when talking about 17 people that they’ve never met who was killed and concern they showed for those injured.  Their serious nature when talking about their safety along with the compassion for others gives me all the hope I need for their well-being now and in the years ahead. While I often find myself at a loss when an event like the Parkland shooting happens, I know that all is not lost when it comes to our future. February 18, 2018 at 3:32 am Don Lindsey is a follower of Christ, son, husband, father, and a survivor.  Originally from Dayton Ohio, and resident of Apopka for six years, Don sees his life as a dedication to his wife, parents, children, and community. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Donny, personally, such incidents as you describe make my heart yearn for a simpler time. The bible verses concerning, “Men’s hearts failing them for fear” and “…wars, wars, and rumors of wars,” reminds me that even though we are living in strange times, Papa God is still in control and the drama of the ages is being played out before our eyes. Yes, dreadful times, and yet Christ’s imminent return is near. He stands at the door and He is saying to each of us, “Fear not, for I am with you. We cannot lose heart, for the words, “Blessed assurance, Jesus is mine, O what a foretaste of glory divine resonate loud and clear. Blessings on each of us. Chaz Wonderfully said Chuck. It give the soul comfort to know that even with the terrible things we see happen so often that God is still with us. Thanks for the comment Chuck and God bless! Reply Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 EVIL will be with us all…till GOD removes it…..as written….amen d Reply February 18, 2018 at 9:11 am February 22, 2018 at 10:30 am Don Lindsey 4 COMMENTS Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Blue Darters, Mustangs hoping to bounce back from midseason losses

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here AP Poll: Apopka falls to #4, Wekiva receives votesIt was a rough week for Apopka football.For the first time this season, both the Apopka Blue Darters and Wekiva Mustangs took a loss on the same night. The Blue Darters fell to the Jones Tigers 21-12, while Wekiva lost its second straight game to the Dr. Phillips Cougars 35-7.Both Apopka and Wekiva are looking to bounce back this week with matchups inside their respective districts.The Blue Darters, now 4-1 and ranked #4 in the Associated Press Florida High School 8A poll, will return to Apopka to host the West Orange Warriors for an 8A District 4 battle. The Blue Darters will play a Warrior squad that is riding a three-game winning streak and coming off a 20-19 win over Lake Mary. West Orange’s record now stands at 4-2. Wekiva Mustangs The Anatomy of Fear Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Both games (West Orange at Apopka, and Ocala Forest at Wekiva) kickoff at 7 PM tonight. And if you want to keep up with the scoring, but can’t make the games, check The Apopka Voice Facebook Page for live updates, and final score alerts. Here are the complete October 8th Associated Press rankings as voted on by a panel of state newspaper sportswriters. Teams are listed with first-place votes in parentheses, records, rating points and their ranking from the previous week: TAGSApopka Blue DartersAssociated Press Florida High School Football PollWekiva Mustangs Previous articleRecall Alert: Blue Bell Butter Crunch ice creamNext articleRed tide report reminds blue-green panel that state urgently needs algae advice Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Mustangs, who fell to 5-2, are also at home to face the Ocala Forest Wildcats in a 7A District 3 matchup. The Wildcats are 3-3 on the season and coming off a 12-7 victory over Pasco last week.center_img Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply CLASS 8ARank, Team, Record, Previous RankingSouth Dade, 6-0, 1Seminole (Sanford), 6-0, 2Bartram Trail, 6-0, 4Apopka, 4-1, 5Vero Beach, 5-0, 5Western, 5-1, 6Miami Palmetto, 5-1, 7Columbus, 4-2, 8Osceola (Kissimmee), 5-1, 9Oakleaf, 5-1, 10First Five Out: Steinbrenner, 6-0; Deerfield Beach, 4-2; Riverview (Sarasota), 4-2; Palm Beach Gardens, 5-1; Dr. Phillips 5-2CLASS 7ARank, Team, Record, Previous RankingLakeland, 7-0, 1St. Thomas Aquinas, 5-0, 2Armwood, 5-1, 4Edgewater, 6-1, 3Palm Beach Lakes, 5-0, 9Plantation, 6-0, 8Niceville, 7-0, 10Bloomingdale, 5-1, NRTampa Bay Tech, 5-1, 5Lincoln, 4-2, NRFirst Five Out: Wekiva, 5-2; Atlantic (Delray), 3-2; Fleming Island, 5-0; Wiregrass Ranch, 5-1; Venice 3-3 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Who invented the Electoral College?

first_img A transcript from the Constitutional Convention records the official report creating the Electoral College. U.S. National Archives, CC BY-NC-ND Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your name here The Anatomy of Fear LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSCivicsEducationElectionsElectoral CollegehistoryOriginsPresidentThe Conversation Previous articleOrange Co. Clerk of Court hosts Operation Green Light to help residents get driver licenses reinstatedNext articleThe Economic and Environmental Implications of Florida’s Surging Population Growth Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By Phillip J VanFossen, J.F. Ackerman Professor of Social Studies Education; Director, Ackerman Center; Associate Director, Purdue Center for Economic Education, Purdue UniversityThe delegates in Philadelphia agreed, in the summer of 1787, that the new country they were creating would not have a king but rather an elected executive. But they did not agree on how to choose that president.Pennsylvania delegate James Wilson called the problem of picking a president “in truth, one of the most difficult of all we have to decide.” Other delegates, when they later recounted the group’s effort, said “this very subject embarrassed them more than any other – that various systems were proposed, discussed, and rejected.”They were at risk of concluding their meetings without finding a way to pick a leader. In fact, this was the very last thing written into the final draft. Had no agreement been reached, the delegates would not have approved the Constitution.I am a civics educator who has also run Purdue University’s Constitution Day celebration for 15 years, and one lesson I always return to is the degree to which the founders had to compromise in order to ensure ratification. Selecting the president was one of those compromises.Three approaches were debated during the Constitutional Convention: election by Congress, selection by state legislatures and a popular election – though the right to vote was generally restricted to white, landowning men.Delegates to the Constitutional Convention had to invent an entire new form of government. Howard Chandler Christy/Architect of the CapitolShould Congress pick the president?Some delegates at the Constitutional Convention thought that letting Congress pick the president would provide a buffer from what Thomas Jefferson referred to as the “well-meaning, but uninformed people” who, in a nation the size of the United States, “could have no knowledge of eminent characters and qualifications and the actual selection decision.”Others were concerned that this approach threatened the separation of powers created in the first three articles of the Constitution: Congress might choose a weak executive to prevent the president from wielding veto power, reducing the effectiveness of one of the system’s checks and balances. In addition, the president might feel indebted to Congress and yield some power back to the legislative branch.Virginia delegate James Madison was concerned that giving Congress the power to select the president “would render it the executor as well as the maker of laws; and then … tyrannical laws may be made that they may be executed in a tyrannical manner.”That view persuaded his fellow Virginian George Mason to reverse his previous support for congressional election of the president and to then conclude that he saw “making the Executive the mere creature of the Legislature as a violation of the fundamental principle of good Government.”These 11 men agreed on a compromise that created the Electoral College.The Conversation, from Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-NDLetting state lawmakers chooseSome delegates thought getting states directly involved in picking the leader of the national government was a good approach for the new federal system.But others, including Alexander Hamilton, worried that states would select a weak executive, to increase their own power. Hamilton also observed that legislators are often slower to move than top leaders might be expected to: “In the legislature, promptitude of decision is oftener an evil than a benefit.”It’s not as pithy as the musical, perhaps, but the point is clear: Don’t trust the state legislatures.Power to the people?The final approach debated was that of popular election. Some delegates, like New York delegate Gouverneur Morris, viewed the president as the “guardian of the people,” whom the public should elect directly.The Southern states objected, arguing that they would be disadvantaged in a popular election in proportion to their actual populations because of the large numbers of enslaved people in those states who could not vote. This was eventually resolved – in one of those many compromises – by counting each enslaved person as three-fifths of a free person for the purposes of representation.George Mason, a delegate from Virginia, shared Jefferson’s skepticism about regular Americans, saying it would be “unnatural to refer the choice of a proper character for chief Magistrate to the people, as it would, to refer a trial of colours to a blind man. The extent of the Country renders it impossible that the people can have the requisite capacity to judge of the respective pretensions of the Candidates.”The Journal of the Federal Convention records the formal proposal to create the Electoral College. U.S. National ArchivesThe Journal of the Federal Convention records the formal proposal to create the Electoral College. U.S. National Archives11 left to make the decisionThe delegates appointed a committee of 11 members – one from each state at the Constitutional Convention – to solve this and other knotty problems, which they called the “Grand Committee on Postponed Questions,” and charged with resolving “unfinished business, including how to elect the President.”At the beginning, six of the 11 members preferred national popular elections. But they realized they could not get the Constitution ratified with that provision: The Southern states simply would not agree to it.Between Aug. 31 and Sept. 4, 1787, the committee wrestled with producing an acceptable compromise. The committee’s third report to the Convention proposed the adoption of a system of electors, through which both the people and the states would help choose the president. It’s not clear which delegate came up with the idea, which was a partly national and partly federal solution, and which mirrored other structures in the Constitution.Popularity and protectionHamilton and the other founders were reassured that with this compromise system, neither public ignorance nor outside influence would affect the choice of a nation’s leader. They believed that the electors would ensure that only a qualified person became president. And they thought the Electoral College would serve as a check on a public who might be easily misled, especially by foreign governments.But the original system – in which the winner of the Electoral College would become president and the runner-up became vice president – fell apart almost immediately. By the election of 1800, political parties had arisen. Because electoral votes for president and vice president were not listed on separate ballots, Democratic-Republican running mates Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr tied in the Electoral College, sending the contest to the House of Representatives. The House ultimately chose Jefferson as the third president, leaving Burr as vice president – not John Adams, who had led the opposing Federalist party ticket.The problem was resolved in 1804 when the 12th Amendment was ratified, allowing the electors to cast separate ballots for president and vice president. It has been that way ever since.This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license.center_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 last_img read more